MGGS High Performance Programme 2017-03-07T11:21:59+00:00

MGGS High Performance Programme

 

At MGGS, we aim to stretch and challenge all of our students. Across all departments there are challenging lessons and extra-curricular opportunities designed to ensure that students’ talents are fully developed and their interest maintained and nurtured.

Every member of staff uses a range of teaching techniques to stretch students. These include targeted questions, differentiated lessons and activities, and opportunities to develop knowledge and enthusiasm beyond the standard curriculum. Alongside our status as an Advanced Thinking School, we aim to make every lesson intellectually challenging for all. Students are also stretched at departmental level, for example through the provision of extension sessions such as lunchtime and after school clubs, outside speakers and visits.

Additional opportunities available to students include ‘Friday Forum’, a lunchtime lecture/discussion group for years 10 and 11; participation in the national ‘Mock Bar’ trials; public speaking; and the Sixth Form Debating Society. In the Sixth Form, students have the chance to pursue topics that fascinate them, for example by completing and Extended Project Qualification, and Oxford University modules. We also have a Google Classroom, the ‘High Performance Programme’, where staff post links to ideas and opportunities aimed at developing enquiring minds.

Talented students like ours will also want to further their interests and knowledge outside the classroom environment. By following the links below, parents and carers can get some suggestions of ways in which they can help their child fully explore the passions and enthusiasms they have developed in class.

We recognise that many of our parents and carers have passions and enthusiasms of their own! We are always interested to hear ideas and suggestions for how we might extend the exciting programme we aim to give our students.

  • Have a range of Art materials at home to support completion of homework
  • Attend assigned in school Art support sessions
  • Undertake visits to Art galleries and exhibitions of interest
  • Participate in local family art activities/ gallery and museum workshops
  • Keep up to date with current affairs, in particular Art related news stories
  • Keep a small sketchbook for recording visually interesting material; including notes/drawings/images from magazines/film and television imagery/photographs
  • Enter local and national Art and photography competitions
  • Watch you tube tutorials to practice techniques

Useful art materials to have at home:

  • A range of sketching pencils
  • Coloured pencils
  • Oil Pastels
  • Chalk Pastels
  • Watercolour Paints
  • Round tip and flat head brushes
  • Acrylic paints
  • Black fineliner
  • Glue
  • Scissors
  • Camera

Useful supporting visits

  • National Gallery
  • National Portrait Gallery
  • Tate Modern
  • Tate Britain
  • Saatchi Gallery
  • Whitechapel Gallery
  • Royal Academy of Arts
  • British Museum
  • V&A Museum
  • Turner Contemporary (Margate)
  • Maidstone Museum and Benlif Art Gallery
  • Sidney Cooper Gallery (Canterbury)

Useful websites

Within the BICE Department, Gifted and Talented pupils are a group whose range of attainment will be varied in BICE as there are large differences between topics (for example some have a strong creative focus, while others have a strong analytical focus). Gifted and Talented students may also demonstrate leadership qualities, high-level practical skills or a capacity for creative thought. The aims for the department with regards to G+T students is:

  • To extend experiences for those pupils who are gifted and talented.
  • To encourage gifted and talented pupils to fulfill their potential.
  • To encourage gifted and talented pupils to take more responsibility for their own learning through independent learning activities.

A broad definition of a G+T student in BICE:

a) Those pupils who possess a general academic learning ability which is significantly greater than most of their peers.

b) Those that show an exceptional talent or gift. This might be in a particular curriculum area such as Programming.

Gifted and Talented students are likely to:

  • think through a problem quickly and accurately;
  • work systematically through a problem;
  • generate creative working solutions;
  • work flexibly, processing unfamiliar information and applying knowledge, experience and insight to unfamiliar situations;
  • communicate their thoughts and ideas well;
  • be determined, diligent and interested in uncovering patterns;
  • achieve, or show potential, in a wide range of contexts;
  • be particularly creative;
  • demonstrate particular skill with specific hardware/software;
  • make sound judgements;
  • Develop synoptic links between our subjects and others
  • be outstanding leaders or team members;
  • be fascinated by, or passionate about, Business, Economics, ICT & Computing;

When identifying pupils who are gifted in Computing/ICT, it is important to remember that they may not be gifted in all aspects of the subject. For example, some pupils may be able to use high-level programming skills to solve control problems, but may not be as good at constructing and investigating databases.
When identifying pupils who are gifted in Business/Economics, it is important to remember that they may not be gifted in all aspects of the subject. For example, some pupils may be able to use creative skills to solve marketing problems, but may not be as good at calculating financial ratios.

Strategies to be used in BICE:

KS3:

  • Encouragement to attend extra curricular clubs
  • Encouragement to attend trips and visits and guest speakers
  • Participation in national competitions
  • Encouragement to utilise technology outside of lessons (using free and open source software where at all possible)
  • All lesson plans/resources include provision for higher level questions and freedom to develop links between topics
  • Homework activities to include open ended research tasks to give a wider scope
  • Students encouraged to undertake wider reading
  • Within lessons, the learning task can always be extended to incorporate higher level skills or thinking

KS4:

  • Encouragement to run and organise extra curricular clubs
  • Encouragement to attend trips and visits and events by guest speakers
  • Participation in national competitions
  • Encouragement to utilise technology outside of lessons (using free and open source software where at all possible)
  • All lesson plans/resources include provision for higher level questions and freedom to develop links between topics
  • Homework activities to include open ended research tasks to give a wider scope
  • Students encouraged to undertake wider reading
  • Within lessons, the learning task can always be extended to incorporate higher level skills or thinking

KS5:

  • Encouragement to become subject prefects and ambassadors for the subject
  • Encouragement to run and organise extra curricular clubs
  • Participation in national competitions
  • Encouragement to attend trips and visits and events by guest speakers
  • Encouragement to utilise technology outside of lessons (using free and open source software where at all possible)
  • All lesson plans/resources include provision for higher level questions and freedom to develop links between topics
  • G+T students must show evidence of addressing all the assessment objectives, especially AO4 – Evaluation
  • Resources on hand to specifically address AO4 evaluation skills
  • Homework activities to include open ended research tasks to give a wider scope
  • Students encouraged to undertake wider reading
  • Within lessons, the learning task can always be extended to incorporate higher level skills or thinking
  • A-Level course allows differentiation by outcome where G+T students access the more technical and advanced sections of the controlled assessment and areas of the exam specifications
Year 7

  • G&T Resources for Year 7 Micro:Bits given out by the BBC
  • Participation in National Beaver Computing Challenge
  • Attendance at Weekly Computing Club run by Year 13 Subject Prefects
Year 8

  • G&T Students went to Accenture as part of the STEMettes STEM in a Day trip
  • Participation in National Beaver Computing Challenge
  • Attendance at Weekly Computing Club run by Year 13 Subject Prefects
Year 9

  • G&T Students went to Accenture as part of the STEMettes STEM in a Day trip
  • Participation in National Beaver Computing Challenge
  • Attendance at Weekly Computing Club run by Year 13 Subject Prefects
Year 10

  • Stretch and challenge resources for G&T Computing and ICT students
  • Participation in National Beaver Computing Challenge
Year 11

  • Students invited to talks by Jenny Scott – Executive at Bank of England and David Dein, former Chairman of the Football Association
Year 12

  • Trip to ILM and King – Computing Trip. GT Students got to meet with employees for networking opportunities
  • Students invited to talks by Jenny Scott – Executive at Bank of England and David Dein, former Chairman of the Football Association
  • Trips to Bank of England and City of London
Year 13

  • Trip to ILM and King – Computing Trip. GT Students got to meet with employees for networking opportunities
  • Running the KS3 Computing Club
  • Students invited to talks by Jenny Scott – Executive at Bank of England and David Dein, former Chairman of the Football Association
  • Trips to Bank of England and City of London

  • Extra-curricular activities are a good way to stretch an enquiring mind.  Activities are run for National Science and Engineering Week, and all students are encouraged to attend.
  • KS5 students have the opportunity to mentor younger students studying GCSE Biology once a week.  KS3 and KS4 students can have a KS5 subject mentor.
  • Participation at KS3 science club once a week.
  • Biology surgery once a week.
  • Regular reading around the subject.  A reading list is included at the end of this document.
  • Biology television programmes such as BBC Horizon (regularly repeated on BBC4).
  • Completion of past examination papers.
  • Glossaries of keywords, definitions, and equations.
  • Headstart courses and books for Year 12 students.

Useful supporting visits

  • Science Museum, London
  • Natural History Museum, London
  • Monthly lectures at University of Kent
  • Kew Gardens, London
  • Wakehurst Place, Sussex
  • Down House – Charles Darwin’s House, Kent
  • Kent Festival of Science, Kent, held at MGGS (once a year)
  • Howletts & Port Lympne Wild Animal Parks
  • Wildwood
  • London Aquarium
  • Eden Project
  • A rural location is always good for observing and investigating ecosystems
  • Kent Wildlife Trust centres and nature reserves

Useful publications

  • New Scientist
  • National Geographic
  • Scientific American
  • BBC Focus magazine

Useful websites/Podcasts

Reading list

  • The Selfish Gene, Richard Dawkins
  • The Greatest Show on Earth, Richard Dawkins
  • The Blind Watchmaker, Richard Dawkins
  • The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, Rebecca Skloot
  • A Brave New World, Aldous Huxley (Fiction)
  • Silent Spring, Rachel Carson
  • The Sixth Extinction, Elizabeth Kolbert
  • Life on Earth, David Attenborough
  • The Private Life of Plants, David Attenborough

     Horrible Science series excellent for KS3 (Years 7 & 8)

  • Blood, bones and body bits
  • Nasty Nature
  • Disgusting Digestion
  • Deadly Diseases
  • Ugly Bugs
  • Microscopic Monsters
  • Bulging Brains

  • Students must read and watch news and current affairs programmes on a regular basis.
  • Extra-curricular activities are a good way to stretch an enquiring mind. Activities are run within the department including a FTSE 100 and ForEX trading competition.
  • Students are invited to apply for a position in the school team that is entered in the Business and Accountancy National Competition.
  • The department hosts ‘Speakers for Schools’ lectures at the school. Previous guests include Jenny Scott, Executive at the Bank of England and David Dein, Vice-Chairman of Arsenal FC and the Football Association.
  • Business and Economics surgery twice a week.
  • Business and Economics students design and deliver Enterprise sessions for visiting Year 5 students.
  • Regular reading around the subject. A reading list is included at the end of this document.
  • Completion of past examination papers.
  • Glossaries of key words, definitions and units.

Useful supporting visits

  • Bank of England, London
  • Various Business/Organisations within The City, London
  • Coca-Cola Factory
  • TheInstitute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales

Useful publications

  • Economist Magazine
  • The Financial Times
  • Broadsheet Newspapers

Useful websites

Reading list

  • Lean In – Sheryl Sandberg
  • The Virgin Way – Sir Richard Branson
  • The Economic Naturalist – Robert H Frank
  • Economics in Minutes – Niall Kishtainy
  • A Whole New Mind – Daniel H. Pink
  • The World is Flat – Thomas L. Friedman

  • Extra-curricular activities are a good way to stretch an enquiring mind.  Activities are run for STEM Week (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) and all students are encouraged to attend.
  • KS3, KS4 and KS5 Chemistry High Performance and Reading Classrooms.
  • KS5 students have the opportunity to mentor younger students studying GCSE Chemistry once a week.  KS4 students can have a KS5 subject mentor.
  • Participation at KS3 science club once a week.
  • Chemistry surgery every Friday lunchtime.
  • Regular reading around the subject.  
  • A reading list is included at the end of this document.
  • Completion of past examination papers.
  • Glossaries of key words, definitions and equations.
  • Headstart courses for Year 12 students

Useful supporting visits

  • Science Museum, London
  • Natural History Museum, London
  • Monthly lectures at University of Kent
  • Kent Festival of Science, Kent, held at MGGS (once a year)
  • Royal Society of Chemistry Lectures

Useful publications

  • New Scientist
  • ChemNet
  • Scientific American
  • BBC Focus magazine

Useful websites

Reading List

Key Stage 3

  • ‘How to dunk a doughnut, The Science of Everyday Life’- Len Fisher
  • ‘Horrible Science, Chemical Chaos’ – Nick Arnold

Key Stage 4/5

  • ‘Nature’s Building Blocks, An A-Z Guide to the Elements’- John Emsley
  • ‘Uncle Tungsten, Memories of a Chemical Boyhood’- Oliver Sacks
  • ‘Molecules at an Exhibition, The Science of  Everyday Life- John Emsley
  • ‘Elements of Murder : A History of Poison’-  John Emsley
  • ‘Salt: A World History’- Mark Kurlansky
  • ‘The chemistry of explosives’- Akhavan, Jacqueline
  • ‘Magic molecules – how drugs work’ – Aldridge, Susan
  • ‘The chemistry of fragrances’ – Rhodes, Richard
  • ‘Elegant solutions : ten beautiful experiments in chemistry’;
  • ‘H2O – a biography of water’;
  • ‘The ingredients – a guided tour of the elements’
  • ‘Stories of the invisible – a guided tour of the molecules’

  • Extra-curricular activities are a good way to stretch an enquiring mind. Activities are run during STEM week at school as well as National Coding week within the KS3 curriculum.
  • All students who undertake Computing and/or ICT from KS3 to KS5 are put forward for the National Computer Challenge (Beaver Challenge) in November, pitting our school against schools nationally.
  • KS4 students are undertaking the Harvard University online course on CS50 –an introduction to the intellectual enterprises of computer science and the art of programming.
  • Participation at KS3 Coding Club once a week.
  • BICE Help to stretch able students with programming on Wednesday lunchtimes.
  • KS5 students to optionally participate in British Computer Olympiad. Successful participants will go onto the International Computer Olympiad.
  • KS3 students to undertake power searching in order to search efficient and effectively online for useful information – linked to digital literacy.
  • Regular reading around the subject. A reading list is included at the end of this document.
  • Technology television programmes such as BBC Click (regularly repeated on BBC News and on iPlayer).
  • Completion of past examination papers.
  • Glossaries of key words, definitions and units which are available in KS4 and 5 booklets given out at the start of the academic year.
  • Trips for run throughout the year for KS4 and 5 students including international trips. Notable trips include Computing trip to San Francisco and to The National Museum of Computing
  • Linking with leading organisations, such as STEMettes, in Computing and ICT

Useful supporting visits

  • Science Museum, London
  • Bletchley Park, Milton Keynes
  • The National Museum of Computing, Milton Keynes
  • Microsoft UK, Reading
  • University of Greenwich
  • Google UK, London
  • Silicon Valley, San Francisco
  • STEM in a Day visits, various UK locations

Useful websites

Reading list

Programming

Python for Beginners– Nick Williamson

Computing and Programming – Shahneila Saeed

Dictionary of Computing – Berry, Valetin, Valdivia

Biographies and autobiographies

The Facebook Effect – David Kirkpatrick

Lean In: women, Work and the Will to Lead – Cheryl Sandberg

General

Alex’s Adventures in Numberland – Alex Bellos

  • Encourage participation in the Arkwright Scholarship programme
  • KS5 students have the opportunity to mentor younger students studying GCSE Design Technology subjects once a week.  KS4 students can have a KS5 subject mentor.
  • Student leadership opportunities – Prefect positions for Product Design and Textiles
  • Participation at KS3 Textiles club once a week (run on a Wednesday lunchtime). Year 7 STEM club once a week (Monday) run by sixth form prefects.
  • Participation in both DT and school-run competitions in food- Bake Off, Kent Cooks and Kent Young Chefs.
  • DT support sessions at lunchtimes and after school
  • Regular reading around the subject.  A reading list is included at the end of this document.
  • DT television programmes such as Sewing Bee, Great British Bake off, How it works (BBC4), Grand Designs, Hugh’s war on waste
  • Completion of past examination papers with supporting examiners reports and markschemes.
  • Glossaries of key and command words (displayed in classrooms and available on the AQA website http://www.aqa.org.uk/search?collection=aqa-web-meta&profile=_default&form=web&query=command+words
  • Participation in summer schools at London School of Fashion

Useful supporting visits

  • Fashion and Textile Museum, London
  • Natural History Museum, London
  • Design Museum, London
  • Victoria and Albert Museum, London
  • Science Museum, London
  • New Designers Exhibition, London
  • Bi annual Milan visit
  • Henry Poole Tailors, Savile Row

Advice

Be Organised – Coming to the lessons prepared is an essential part of Design Technology. Students need to ensure that they have the correct equipment, books and if necessary, ingredients to be able to fully participate in the lesson.

Persist – Always stick to it and persevere through a task. Don’t give up on extended writing pieces; it’s better to get it all done at once, like you would in an exam.

If you are finding something tricky, don’t just put it to one side, research the subject/practical technique and try to improve. If you are really stuck work collaboratively with a peer.

Think Flexibly – Look at questions from different angles and don’t always assume that there is only one answer. For an eight mark question there may be up to 16 possible points that can be stated to pick up those marks. It’s better to write too much than too little.

When developing your designs for your coursework, don’t dismiss initial ideas too quickly, look at the ideas from different perspectives and see where they can be improved. There are infinite ways ideas can be modified.

Useful publications

  • Creative Review, How things work

Useful websites

Reading list

  • Extreme Textiles (Thames and Hudson)
  • Fashion Design (Sue Jenkyn Jones)
  • Fashion (Gertrud Lehnert)
  • The Fashion Handbook (Tim Jackson)
  • Sports Tech (Marie O’Mahony)
  • Clothing Technology (Europa Lehrmittel)
  • Guide to textile terms (Weston Publishing)
  • The definitive visual history of design (DK publishing)
  • Deconstructing product design (William Lidwell and Gerry Manasca)

  • There are a range of extra-curricular activities to support gifted and talented students in English. As follows:
  • Lunchtime surgeries run four times a week
  • KS5 English prefects run reading and creative writing clubs for younger students to attend.
  • Google classroom to showcase the best writing by our students and for students to receive tailored feedback and advice.
  • National competitions which are advertised to student – poetry and writing.
  • Reading lists provide suggestions for more stretching reading material.
  • Author visits to the school to inspire gifted and talented students.

Useful supporting visits

  • Theatre trips e.g Globe and The Marlowe Theatre, Canterbury. Woman in Black West End.
  • The British Library
  • Rochester – Dickens walking tour and annual festival.
  • Canterbury Chaucer museum.
  • Strawberry Hill – National Trust home of Horace Walpole (first gothic novel).
  • Bronte museum in Howarth
  • Hays Literary Festival

Useful Publications:

  • Times Literary Supplement
  • Guardian Reviews
  • The English Review
  • The Carnegie Shortlist

Useful websites

Reading list

We have extensive reading lists for each key stage which cover fiction and no fiction texts. They can be found via the school website or in the school library. Some examples of relevant material can be found below:

KS3

  • Blackman, Malorie – Noughts and Crosses
  • Blume, Judy – Starring Sally J Freedman as herself
  • Fine, Anne – Flour Babies
  • Pullaman, Philip – The Northern Lights Trilogy
  • Marcus, Sedgwick – The Ghosts of Heaven

KS4 / KS5

  • Bronte, Emily – Wuthering Heights
  • Du Maurier – Daphne, Rebecca
  • Donaghue, Emma – The Read Room
  • EM Forster – Room with a View
  • Hardy, Thomas – Tess of the D’Urbevilees
  • Hosseini, Khaled – The Kite Runner

  • Regular reading around the subject. A reading list is included at the end of this document.
  • Completion of past examination papers. Use of examination board website
  • Glossaries of key words, definitions and units.
  • Google classroom –‘ Reach for the Skies’ includes questions for discussion and links to internet resources which will broaden your child’s geographical understanding
  • Develop a good understanding of the locations you visit in relation to your home
  • Encourage your child to watch the BBC news or set their homepage on their computer to BBC news in order to keep up to date with geographical issues
  • Watch documentaries on TV relating to world issues
  • Encourage your child to enter geography competitions promoted in school
  • Encourage your child to take photos of interesting geographical locations and contribute to ‘Your World’ google classroom

Useful supporting visits

  • Science Museum, London
  • Natural History Museum, London
  • The British Museum London
  • The Royal Geographical Society Kensington
  • Visit a variety of coastal locations and look at the different landscapes
  • Any holiday location can be viewed as an opportunity to find out about people and environment in an area – encourage your child to ask questions about the place visited

Useful publications

  • National Geographic
  • Daily newspapers
  • Geography review

Useful websites

Reading list

  • Prisoners of Geography – Ten maps that tell you everything you need to know about global politics  -Tim Marshall
  • Hello, is this planet Earth?: My View from the International Space Station – Tim Peake..
  • The Making Of The British Landscape: From the Ice Age to the Present – Nicholas Crane
  • Around The World In Eighty Days Paperback – 25 Jun 2009
  • Overview: A New Perspective of   Earth Hardcover – Benjamin Grant
  • Planet Earth: As You’ve Never Seen It Before by Alastiar Fothergill
  • The Blue Planet Hardcover by Andrew Byatt
  • Galapagos: Islands Born of Fire by Tui De Roy

 The best way to support your child in History is to regularly watch reputable news and discuss the issues thrown up. Two themes can be explored:

  1. The causes of current events and conflicts: by watching or reading news coverage, you child can understand current affairs and begin to develop an understanding of the causes of these events going further back into the past
  2. The coverage itself: discussing different reports or representations of the same story will develop your child’s critical faculties, a skill of extreme importance given the development of the internet as the main source of news for many of our children.
  • Trips & visits: obtaining family National Trust or English Heritage membership is an excellent way to occupy children of all ages at weekends and there are many wonderful historical sites to visit in Kent: Dover Castle (English Heritage) has a wealth of activities from the Medieval Period to the World Wars whilst Churchill’s House (Chartwell, National Trust) gives more of a biographical take. When going on holidays abroad, read up about the history of your destination (Lonely Planet guides and the website have a lot on information) and incorporate historical visits into your schedule.
  • Completion of past examination papers.
  • Glossaries of GCSE vocabulary lists, key words, definitions and grammar tables
  • Enhance cultural knowledge through authentic materials such as books and plays.

Useful supporting visits

  • One day trip to Boulogne-sur-Mer, France, year 7
  • Residential trip to Paris, France, year 9
  • Institut Français visit for KS4 and KS5 classes
  • Residential trip to Andalucia, Spain, year 9
  • Biannual residential trip to Madrid, Spain, year 12 and 13
  • Two day trip to Aachen, Germany, year 8
  • 5 day residential trip to Berlin, Germany, years 10 to 13
  • One day visit to Cambridge University for Gifted and Talented students

Useful publications

  • Mary Glasgow Magazines
  • Dein Spiegel

Useful websites

Reading list

  • Target Language Books in the school library
  • “I can read French” books (bilingual books)
  • “Bienvenue dans notre monde” play
  • Le Petit Prince, St Exupéry
  • No et Moi, Delphine de Vigan
  • 14-14, Paul Béorn et Silène Edgar
  • The New Spaniards – John Hooper
  • Requiem por un campesino – Ramón J Sender
  • El Sueño de Otto – Rosana Acquaroni
  • Spanish Grammar – Butt & Benjamin
  • Penguin Short Stories in German – parallel texts
  • Learn German with Stories series
  • Ich fühle mich so fifty-fifty, König
  • Der Vorleser, Bernhard Schlink (16+ only)
  • Red love: the story of an East German family, Maxim Leo
  • The People’s State: East German society from Hitler to Honecker

  • Extra-curricular activities are a good way to stretch an enquiring mind. The United Kingdom Mathematics Trust runs annual competitions for students of all age groups. These are both individual challenges which run in school and team competitions that students are selected to compete in.
  • Maths Help sessions run most lunch times.
  • Regular reading around the subject. A reading list is included at the end of this document.
  • Mathematics television programmes such as The Story of Maths (BBC 4)
  • Completion of past examination papers.
  • High quality notes made by students to show correct methods for questions.

Useful supporting visits

  • Maths Inspiration talks at The Marlowe Theatre
  • Team Maths Challenge competitions

Useful websites

Reading list

  • Alex’s Adventures in Numberland by Alex Bellos
  • Cabinet of Mathematical Curiosities by Ian Stewart
  • The Num8er My5teries by Marcus du Sautoy
  • How Many Socks Make a Pair?: Surprisingly Interesting Maths by Rob Eastway
  • The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon
  • The Calculus Wars by Jason Socrates Bardi
  • The Code Book by Simon Singh

  • Extra-curricular activities are a good way to stretch an enquiring mind.  Activities are run for KS3 wtih “Spelling Bee” competition 2017
  • KS5 students have the opportunity to mentor younger students studying GCSE French, German and Spanish once a week.  KS3 and KS4 students can have a KS5 subject mentor.
  • Participation at KS3 French club once a week.
  • MFL revision session once a week on Wednesday lunchtime in A301.
  • Regular reading around the subject.  A reading list is included at the end of this document. In addition language magazine are available for students to borrow or purchase at all levels.
  • MFL television programmes such as TV5 Monde and Youtube videos (songs, cartoons, sitcoms) and websites (Kerboodle, languagesonline, quizlet, Kahoot, Zut, Olé, Gut)
  • Completion of past examination papers.
  • Glossaries of GCSE vocabulary lists, key words, definitions and grammar tables
  • Enhance cultural knowledge through authentic materials such as books and plays.

Useful supporting visits

  • One day trip to Boulogne-sur-Mer, France, year 7
  • Residential trip to Paris, France, year 9
  • Institut Français visit for KS4 and KS5 classes
  • Residential trip to Andalucia, Spain, year 9
  • Biannual residential trip to Madrid, Spain, year 12 and 13
  • Two day trip to Aachen, Germany, year 8
  • 5 day residential trip to Berlin, Germany, years 10 to 13
  • One day visit to Cambridge University for Gifted and Talented students

Useful publications

  • Mary Glasgow Magazines
  • Dein Speigel

Useful websites

Reading list

  • Target Language Books in the school library
  • “I can read French” books (bilingual books)
  • “Bienvenue dans notre monde” play
  • Le Petit Prince, St Exupéry
  • No et Moi, Delphine de Vigan
  • 14-14, Paul Béorn et Silène Edgar
  • The New Spaniards – John Hooper
  • Requiem por un campesino – Ramón J Sender
  • El Sueño de Otto – Rosana Acquaroni
  • Spanish Grammar – Butt & Benjamin
  • Penguin Short Stories in German – parallel texts
  • Learn German with Stories series
  • Ich fühle mich so fifty-fifty, König
  • Der Vorleser, Bernhard Schlink (16+ only)
  • Red love: the story of an East German family, Maxim Leo
  • The People’s State: East German society from Hitler to Honecker

Practical

  • Participate in School Extracurricular Clubs
  • Join external sports clubs
  • Practice techniques at home
  • Develop core skills and strength (e.g. fitness)
  • Develop knowledge of rules and tactics – watch sporting events on TV/live etc.
  • Research videos that help to develop technique e.g. National Governing Body Websites

Theory

  • Download Apps to your smartphone (BBC Sport, Sky Sports News, National Governing Bodies)
  • Watch Sporting Events (Live/TV)
  • Read and research sporting journals
  • Read Sports Sections of the Newspapers (try and avoid tabloids)
  • Read Sport Specific books (factual, fiction, autobiographies)
  • Look on websites for interesting articles – Teach PE, Brianmac, Peak Performance, British Medical Journals
  • Complete extension tasks in lessons and for homework
  • Read the PE notice board – ‘Read all about it’
  • Download and read, past papers, mark schemes, examiner reports, and specifications

Useful websites

  • There are many Psychological articles featured in the quality press. Encourage the student to read newspapers regularly.
  • Student membership of the British Psychological Society gives access to up to date research and extended reading (see link to website).
  • Documentaries often cover issues of interest – for example, dealing with mental health or aspects of Forensic Psychology.
  • Encourage discussion of what students have learned in class.
  • Students can access extension articles and other links on the Psychology classroom.
  • Completion of past examination papers.
  • Glossaries of key words.

Useful supporting visits

  • Science Museum, London (including the ‘Who Am I?’ exhibition)
  • The Freud Museum, London
  • Bethlem Museum of the Mind
  • Imperial War Museum Holocaust Exhibition

Useful publications

  • New Scientist
  • Scientific American
  • Any quality newspaper
  • Psychology Review

Useful websites

Reading list

  • Opening Skinners Box  Lauren Slater
  • 50 Psychology Classics  Tom Butler-Bowdon
  • The Blank Slate Stephen Pinker
  • Classic Case Studies in Psychology  Geoff Rolls
  • Consciousness Explained Daniel C. Demmett
  • The Emerging Mind VS Ramachandran
  • Blink and/or The Tipping Point  and/or Outliers  Malcolm Gladwell
  • Introducing Evolutionary Psychology Icon Books
  • As Nature Made Him: The Boy Who Was Raised as a Girl John Colapinto
  • Tricks of the Mind Derren Brown
  • Thinking Fast and Slow Daniel Kahneman

  • Discuss issues of moral/philosophical/religious concern as they arise
  • Read the news and discuss the impact/influence of religion on the world
  • Explore your child’s exercise books and discuss any interesting material
  • Complete any extra AAL activities (currently being constructed)
  • Regular reading around the subject.  A reading list is included at the end of this document
  • Watch/listen to topical shows on related topics e.g. the moral maze
  • Completion of past examination papers with supporting examiners reports and mark schemes

Interesting areas to discuss/debate or research

  • Science and Religion
  • Is religion a force for good in the world?
  • Should humans continue to eat meat?
  • Animal Rights
  • Life after death
  • What does it mean to be ‘good’?
  • Should we favour our loved ones over other people?
  • How can we prove something is true?

Advice

Check information for yourselves – If something interests you, then you should start to become your own authority. Ask yourself, how do I know this is true? Where can I find more information?

Explore alternative views – In Religious Studies we want you to create argumentation that is razor sharp. This means you need to ‘sharpen’ your point of view by exploring the best the opposition has to offer.

Practice providing evidence and reasons – Attempt to be able to provide reasoning (logic) or evidence for all of the views you hold. This will help your argument gain more credit in external examinations.

Be challenging and respectful at the same time – Be sensitive to other people’s views and show respect for opinions, whilst researching or working inside a classroom. By developing a space for us all to be secure, we can begin to explore challenging areas of discussion, always targeting the idea and never the person.

Read chapters, passages, extracts etc – Do not feel that you need to read the whole of a difficult text to comment on it. Instead, read snippets, sections or whole books as you please. This will help you to use material that helps/interests you.

Podcast

  • Philosophy bites
  • Philosophy the classics

Useful websites

Reading list

  • Religious Scripture e.g. The Bible/ Quran (remember snippets etc.)
  • Le Petit Prince by Antoine Saint Exupery
  • The Screwtape Letters by CS Lewis
  • The God Delusion by Richard Dawkins
  • The Puzzle of Ethics by Dr Peter Vardy
  • The Philosophy Book by Will Buckingham
  • The Chronicles of Narnia by CS Lewis
  • The Kite runner/ A Thousand splendid suns by Khaled Hosseini
  • I am Malala by Malala Yousafzai
  • The life of Pi by Yann Martel
  • Sophie’s World by Jostein Gaarder
  • Christianity – A Short Introduction by Keith Ward
  • The Dawkins Delusion By Alister McGrath
  • A Beginner’s Guide to Ideas by William Raeper and Linda Smith
  • The Puzzle of God by Peter Vardy
  • God: A Guide for the Perplexed by Keith Ward
  • Ethics Matters by Peter and Charlotte Vardy
  • An Introduction the Philosophy of Religion by Brian Davies