Transition Work for Students Joining Y12

Your MGGS 6th Form Journey Begins Here!

We are looking forward to welcoming you into the MGGS Sixth Form next academic year.

You have a valuable opportunity in the coming months to prepare for your A Level/Cambridge Technical qualifications, and we want to support you in this. The transition from Key Stage 4 to Key Stage 5 is challenging and, despite reducing the number of subjects you study considerably, the depth, breadth, quality and amount of work that you will do will increase. You will grow in your experience, expertise and love of these subjects and will make many happy memories while you’re in the Sixth Form; we are very proud of the community we share and the fantastic work ethic and achievements of our students. Sixth Form study is very different and the best way to ensure a smooth transition is to be ready.

The tasks below have been compiled by MGGS Heads of Department and the Sixth Form Management Team, and have been planned carefully to develop your skills and to enable you to ‘hit the ground running’ when you start your Sixth Form study. We usually release this material after our induction events in July but have chosen to release our transition material early in order that you can broaden your understanding of the subjects you plan to study in advance of the A Level/Cambridge Technical course. In light of the cancellation of examinations and the time you are now spending at home, we have also included lots of additional material – we do not expect anyone to complete all of it!  

First you will find a list of general tasks and advice – none of these are compulsory at this stage but looking through them will give you a good idea of our values and priorities as a school and help you to plan for your time with us.

Below the first table are a selection of tasks for each of our Key Stage 5 subjects for entry 2021.  Compulsory tasks, to be handed in during your first Y12 lessons, are marked with a *.  Other tasks are optional and offered as extra opportunities for development and extension. You can choose how many you undertake.

If you are considering a number of subjects, completing this work may help you to finalise your decision.

If you have any questions related to these tasks, please contact the relevant Head of Department or central@mggs.org. Thank you in advance for your hard work on this; we hope you enjoy it!

Mrs Ransom
Assistant Headteacher for Key Stage 5

1 Do something positive for your mental health and wellbeing

There is a lot that is useful out there, e.g. the Radio 1 Life Hacks podcast (https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/p0875218) which has an episode on mental health generally and one on school closures too.

2 Regularly review your GCSE work, especially in subjects you plan to continue (or related subjects, e.g. maths is relevant in Maths, Sciences, Social Sciences, Business, Economics, Computing, Geography and many more!)

Make sure you’ve finished the course and are secure in your knowledge. You’ll be building on this in KS5 and the knowledge you’ve gained from GCSE courses is an essential foundation for A levels, so make sure you stay on the ball and keep facts, methods and skills fresh in the run up to starting sixth form.

3 Consolidate your independent study skills:

MGGS Sixth Form follows a programme of activities devised by the VESPA Mindset team. Attached are some activities to get you started:

4 Fall in love with your subjects!

Cultivate your passion with super curricular reading. There are lots of good ideas for super curricular activities on Unifrog (if you have access to this through your current school, look at the ‘Geek Out’ section under your subject).

There are also great ideas on:
Staircase12 (University of Oxford) – https://www.univ.ox.ac.uk/applying-to-univ/staircase12/
Discover Downing (University of Cambridge) – http://www.discoverdowning.com/resources/
You might also be interested in Oxplore, which asks big questions to get you thinking – http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/undergraduate/increasing-access/oxplore

5 Podcasts

Find one you like and listen to it regularly to keep up to date in your subject(s). The MGGS Student Guide to Radio 4 may help.

6 One of the options for your Sixth Form Extra hours will be to take on some independent study. You can start this now! Look at the Future Learn courses and MOOCs and find one that is relevant to your future study or career. There are also some great boredom buster courses https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/collections/boredom-busters
7 The Open University has massively increased the number of free courses that are available on their website. This could be a good way to explore an area that you are planning (or considering!) to study in the future https://www.open.edu/openlearn/free-courses/full-catalogue
8 Start working on Post-16/18 careers:

  • Visit the National Careers Service for advice on particular pathways and to find out more about skills required in employment. https://nationalcareers.service.gov.uk/. Complete the skills assessment as a starting activity – this may then help you plan what to work on next.
  • Find out whether there is a professional body for your chosen field of work and check out their website including recent news and any relevant journals that they publish. If you are successful in your field you’ll be expected to be up to date, so get ahead while you have the time. Googling “professional body for x career” is a good place to start if you’re not sure. These sites will also let you know if your degree needs to be accredited or not. For example, any career within psychology will require registering with the BPS (British Psychological Society), and membership requires you to have an accredited psychology degree.
  • One of our top tips is always to join LinkedIn. Join LinkedIn and start making connections with industry professionals. As a keen and ambitious student everyone will want to connect with you if you’re polite and enthusiastic. Include messages with connection requests. Interact with content and keep your page up to date. The network you build here may serve your career long into the future (your classmates may go on to be big business tycoons in a range of fields, so don’t forget to connect to each other too).
9 If you are looking to learn a new skill, British Sign are offering a British Sign Language Course for only £3 to students- https://www.british-sign.co.uk/coronavirus-crisis/

The tasks below have been compiled by the relevant Head of Department and teachers and have been planned carefully to broaden your understanding of the subject to enable you to ‘hit the ground running’ when you start the A Level/Cambridge Technical course. If you have any questions related to these tasks, please contact the Head of Department using the email address detailed below.

Thank you in advance for your hard work on this; we hope you enjoy it!

Mrs Ransom

Department: Art (Art, Craft and Design)
Head of Department: Mrs Jenkins
Contact email: kjenkins@mggs.org

Tasks (in priority order):
All tasks are described below and any additional resources required can be found in this folder.
Those marked with a * must be submitted to your class teacher when you start the A Level/Cambridge Technical course.

  1. *FILL a new sketchbook of photographs, drawings, thoughts, analysis, and artist research which you find inspiring between now and the start of your course. Here are some links to resources that will give you lots of ideas of how to fill a sketchbook page.
    1. Art, Craft and Design – Sketchbook
  2. Watch ‘Graysons Art Club’ and respond to some of his ideas.
  3. Look at First Site for your free Artist Activity Packs, put together by various famous artists. https://firstsite.uk/download-artist-activity-pack/
  4. Look at online exhibitions over the summer, as many of the great galleries have put their exhibitions/tours online. In fact, since the lockdown has been global we now have the opportunity to visit international gallery shows online. Here are some links:
    The Art Newspaper article about exhibitions
    Free Art Magazines
    List of virtual days out

Department: Art (Graphic Communication)
Head of Department: Mrs Jenkins
Contact email: kjenkins@mggs.org

Tasks (in priority order):
All tasks are described below and any additional resources required can be found in this folder.
Those marked with a * must be submitted to your class teacher when you start the A Level/Cambridge Technical course.

  1. *Complete the 160 Project linked here – 160 Project
  2. Create a Pinterest board or small sketchbook full of examples of Graphic Design that you find inspiring/exciting
  3. Look at First Site for your free Artist Activity Packs, put together by various famous artists. https://firstsite.uk/download-artist-activity-pack/
  4. Watch ‘Graysons Art Club’ on catch up and respond to some of his ideas.

Department: Biology
Head of Department: Mr Munro
Contact email: tmunro@mggs.org

Tasks (in priority order):
All tasks are described below and any additional resources required can be found in this folder.
Those marked with a * must be submitted to your class teacher when you start the A Level.

  1. Topical video at the moment: https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01nln7d
    Our secret universe: the hidden life of a cell
    Documentary exploring the inner world of the human cellular structure via the narrative of a viral infection from within the world of a single cell.
  2. *Read document – Transition information – AQA complete all activities
  3. *Complete – Transition from GCSE to A level workbook
  4. *Maths Skills for Biology
  5. Read The Biology – A Level Mindset and try some of the activities / reading.
  6. https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01f51z4 Medical history series.
  7. Seneca A-level preparation course – 0guqtrriz8 https://app.senecalearning.com/
  8. Exchange
  9. Microscopy
  10. Check GCSE knowledge is up to scratch with seneca assessments class code above (8)
  11. Biology – A Level Head Start

Department: Business
Head of Department: Mr Walker
Contact email: nwalker@mggs.org

Tasks (in priority order):
All tasks are described below and any additional resources required can be found in this folder.
Those marked with a * must be submitted to your class teacher when you start the A Level/Cambridge Technical course.

  1. * If you study Business at MGGS you’ll be better informed than the average person in the street about the big issues, such as enterprise and entrepreneurship. You’ll be encouraged to articulate your ideas and to distinguish between facts, bias and opinion.
    Task: Choose a successful entrepreneur to investigate
    Investigate and produce a report covering the following things:
    • Biography of entrepreneur eg age, background, etc
    • An overview of their entrepreneurial / businesses activities
    • The entrepreneurial characteristics you feel they show
    • Key events / activities that have made them successful
  2. Read the business news every day, noting the names of businesses and business leaders of interest.
    http://www.theguardian.com/uk/business
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business
    http://www.economist.com/
    http://www.ft.com/home/uk
  3. Identify at least five businesses of interest to you to follow on social media to keep up to date with their news. There are many to choose from in lots of different sectors, but try to choose a range (e.g. an entertainment business, a restaurant or coffee shop, a sports team or other business, a fashion retailer, a magazine/newspaper, an online business, a food retailer).
  4. Listen to a selection of business podcasts to find a favourite and then commit to listening regularly.
    We recommend:
    The Bottom Line (BBC Radio 4) – lots of episodes, one I enjoyed recently was The discounters.
    More or Less (BBC Radio 4)
    The Disrupters (BBC Radio 4)
    AQA Business podcasts
    Tutor2U
  5. Complete the Tutor2U Initial Numeracy Assessment for Business and self assess using the answers.
  6. It is important to read widely around the A-Level subjects you are studying. Here is the Business & Economics recommended reading list.

Department: Chemistry
Head of Department: Dr Doyle
Contact email: edoyle@mggs.org

Tasks (in priority order):
All tasks are described below and any additional resources required can be found in this folder.
Those marked with a * must be submitted to your class teacher when you start the A Level/Cambridge Technical course.

  1. *Start to organise a folder with dividers for the different topics to be studied (see the A level textbook on Kerboodle). Start a Glossary for A Level Chemistry by researching the definition of key terms in the Chapter index in the A level Chemistry textbook.
  2. * Print and read the Chemistry A Level overview document here.
  3. * Complete the Chemistry – GCSE to A Level Transition Sheet.
  4. * Prepare for a pre-test during the 2nd lesson in September. This will cover GCSE Chemistry knowledge and the following Mathematical Skills (in row 7) that will be developed during the A level course. Overall, at least 20% of the marks in assessments for Chemistry will require the use of mathematical skills. These skills will be applied in the context of Chemistry and will be at least the standard of higher tier GCSE Mathematics.
  5. * Chemistry A Level Mindset – Read and print a copy for your folders. Use the links to develop your notes
  6. * After the July Introduction Day, complete the practice exam question on the Chemistry – Welcome Day Practical Sheet
  7. Work through the Maths Skills for Chemistry
  8. Read, summarise and write up blogs/reports on articles in Chemistry World;
    1. Visit our log in page: https://exacteditions.com/login
    2. Select the “library card” option in the top right-hand corner.
    3. Enter your six-digit code into the “card number” bar and log in. The six-digit code for Maidstone Grammar School for Girls is 170754.
  9. Visit Science Daily every day for a week.  https://www.sciencedaily.com/news/top/science/
    1. Pick one news article a day, that features some chemistry that you find interesting.
    2. Summarise the article in a paragraph
    3. At the end of the week, pick the piece of news that you liked the most and complete 1 hrs worth of additional research, which you can then write a longer summary for.  Try to be objective if you evaluate the chemistry and make sure you are not copy and pasting!
  10. Thinking about your GCSE course, please pick a topic that you found difficult and use a variety of tools to improve your understanding of this topic.  You could use Kerboodle, Seneca, Educake, past paper questions.  Once your knowledge is secure, create a document/slide show that could be used by yourself or others who need to improve knowledge on this topic.  You could even create a bank of questions that you found useful to help improve your understanding.
  11. If you already know what career you want to pursue, use some time to work out the routes that you could follow to reach that goal.  Once you have discovered the routes, pick the route that you think would suit you the most and prepare a map showing the various steps that you need to achieve as you progress.  Highlight any pitfalls and plan how you might be able to avoid these.  This document is one that you can keep and amend as necessary as you move further towards your chosen career.  The important part of this is ensuring you know what you need to progress at each stage and identifying how you can improve your chances of success!
  12. Watch the series of videos Start of refresher lessons  These are a series of lectures posted by a Chemistry Teacher (not MGGS) who is offering some lessons that refresh your knowledge and extend your GCSE knowledge very slightly.  She makes the very valid point that you need to be able to remember and use your GCSE knowledge of Chemistry consistently at A-Level and need to start the course having not forgotten everything!  She does also sell a book, which complements her videos, which you can download or order a hard copy of from her website.

Department: Computer Science
Head of Department: Mrs Jebagnanam
Contact email: ajebagnanam@mggs.org

Tasks (in priority order):
All tasks are described below and any additional resources required can be found in this folder.
Those marked with a * must be submitted to your class teacher when you start the A Level/Cambridge Technical course.

  1. *Future Learn (www.futurelearn.com https://www.futurelearn.com/subjects/it-and-computer-science-courses)
    Future Learn website contains a number of online courses. There are online courses for beginners and novices all the way up to degree courses and courses that are accredited by universities. We have selected a few courses below that contain A-Level Computer Science content that you may like to explore. We recommend that you have a look at the contents of each of the below courses and choose at least one that meets your skills & interest level and complete the course.

      • Getting started with Python
      • Object-oriented Programming in Python: Create Your Own Adventure Game
      • Programming 103: Saving and Structuring Data
      • Programming 102: Think Like a Computer Scientist
      • Introduction to Web Development
      • Functional Programming in Haskell: Supercharge Your Coding
      • An Introduction to Cryptography
      • Introduction to Cyber Security

    Please hand in a screenshot or a certificate to show the completion of one of the courses above in your first lesson in Year 12

  2. *Learning Python**
    The programming language used in A-Level CS at MGGS is Python. So, it’s time to learn the language / strengthen your skills using TutorialsPoint
    https://www.tutorialspoint.com/python/index.htmAn introduction to Interactive Programming in Python – Coursera
    If you have not studied Computer Science for GCSE or have not worked with Python (programming language) before, then you should familiarise yourself with the basic syntax of the programming languageCoursera.org offers many such courses and one of the interactive ones is : An introduction to interactive programming with Python. This course is also suitable for students who have worked with Python before, and are interested in visual game building techniques as the tutorial gradually moves to teach you about Canvas and working with objects, detecting collision etc.https://www.coursera.org/learn/interactive-python-1?specialization=computer-fundamentals#about
    https://www.coursera.org/learn/interactive-python-2?specialization=computer-fundamentals
  3. Keep Current
    It is very important that Computer Science A-Level students are aware of all the latest developments in the technology field. Make sure you keep up to date with what is happening.
    https://uk.reuters.com/news/archive/technologyNews
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology
    http://news.mit.edu/
    https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/computing
    https://www.wired.co.uk/topic/technology
  4. TED Talks
    On TED.com is a bank of free knowledge from ‘the world’s most inspired thinkers’ — and a community of curious souls to engage with ideas and each other. There are a huge number of computing/technology related talks – you can also get these delivered to your inbox when they are released.Ted Talks – Technology filter: https://www.ted.com/talks?topics%5B%5D=technology
  5. The Computer Science A-Level requires you to be a competent programmer and problem solver. There are a number of online platforms that you can use to stretch and challenge your skills.Khan Academy https://www.khanacademy.org/computing
    The Khan Academy website has a section devoted to economics/business/finance courses. It is a website set up offering free courses and content.Codecademy https://www.codecademy.com/catalog/subject/all
    A range of courses set up by career path to give you the practical skills needed for specific job rolesW3Schools https://www.w3schools.com/
    The largest range of web development courses.
  6. Reading!
    One of the most important things you can do to prepare yourself for further study in Computer Science is to ensure that you are as widely read as possible. Exploring as many different texts on different areas/topics/views/eras as possible is going to put you in the best place possible for starting further study. With that in mind here is a reminder of the recommended Computer Science Reading List.

Department: Design and Technology – Fashion and Textiles
Head of Department: Mrs Foy
Contact email: hfoy@mggs.org

Tasks (in priority order):
All tasks are described below and any additional resources required can be found in this folder.
Those marked with a * must be submitted to your class teacher when you start the A Level/Cambridge Technical course.

  1. * Complete the Fashion Illustration taster workshop: Fashion Illustration WorkshopBy the end, you should have completed a number of different fashion illustration styles and perhaps identified your own personal style of illustration to be used over the coming years.
  2. * Key Influences on 19th and 20th Century Fashions: Worksheet LinkComplete the activities on the worksheet as an introduction to the Socio and Economic influences on fashion and clothing styles throughout the 19th and 20th Centuries.
  3. * Solent University Fashion Presentations  – 9th June 12:30-1:30pmSouthampton Solent University has offered to run a virtual session for MGGS students to detail the fashion degrees they have available.  The tutors will talk you through the courses on offer and current students will also discuss their own experiences at the University.  They have asked that you pre-register for the event to allow them to plan appropriately.  Mrs Foy will also be on the talk with current GCSE students.  Please pre-register via the below  link (this can also be used to join with on the day):https://app.geckoform.com/public/#/modern/FOEU02afcXKLXJHM
  4. * Resources required for the September start:
    1. An A4 lever arch file with a set of dividers ready for your theory lessons
    2. An A4 white paper sketchbook for your practical workshops
  5. Fashion/Textiles Designer Case Study: Analysing Designers – A Help GuideChoose one of the following Designers to complete a case study on, it can be presented in a format of your choice.  Explain how and why their work has either already influenced you or may influence you as a designer in the future.  You may like to use the linked help guide. 
    • Paul Poiret 
    • Chanel 
    • Dior
    • Mary Quant
    • Yves St Laurent 
    • Pierre Cardin
    • Vivienne Westwood
    • McQueen
  6. Set up a free WIx website:  Website LinkMaking yourself stand out is vital to your progression following your school career.  Sign up to the link above and begin building your own website that can be used as a platform to showcase your work.  Use it to display your GCSE work, it can then be updated as your progress with your A Level course.
  7. Fashion and Textiles Museum:  On demand and live webinars: Live Events: https://www.ftmlondon.org/online-events/
    On demand events:  https://ftmlondon.digitickets.co.uk/category/31973
    Scroll through and find one which interests you.  There is a cost of £5 per session.
  8. Fashion/Textile days out: If easing of lockdown restrictions permit, take a trip to London along with a family member or students on your course. Visit the following fabric shops:
    • The Berwick Street Cloth ShopBorovick Fabrics Ltd
    • Borovick Fabrics Ltd
    • Barnett Lawson Trimmings (my particular favourite)

    If you are unable to visit in person, take the time to browse their websites as they have a vast array of fabrics and trimmings that may be of use to you in future projects.

    There will hopefully also be a number of museum exhibitions to visit

    • Kensington Palace: Royal Style in the Making (Princess Diana’s wedding gown on display)
    • The V and A: Alice – Curiouser and Curiouser (exploring a global phenomenon loved by all ages – including lots of fashion garments inspired by this theme)
    • Farleys House and Gallery: Lee Miller – Fashion in Wartime Britain (Lee Miller’s fashion photography captured during the Second World War – offers great insight into war inspired fashions)
    • Fashion and Textiles Museum: Chintz – Cotton in Bloom (An exhibition dedicated to chintz, the once intricate art of printing pattern on cotton fabric)
    • Christian Dior: Designer Of Dreams: If you didn’t get a chance to visit the spectacular exhibition at the V&A back in 2019, you can now experience the enchanting showcase from home. Dior has released an hour-long film available to watch for free via YouTube detailing the curation of the retrospective initially hosted at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris, from the elaborate dress tailoring to the comprehensive exhibition construction and glamorous opening night. Watch now via the Christian Dior YouTube channel.
  9. Free Future Learn Course: Fashion values Nature (approx 12hrs study time):https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/fashion-values-nature
    Understand biodiversity in the context of fashion and create a plan for fashion that protects Earth’s ecosystems. (approximately 12hrs of study time).
    Discover fashion practices that can protect, restore, and regenerate ecosystems
    Explore the impact of fashion on biodiversity and earth’s systems
    Use design thinking to radically rethink fashion products, services, and systems
  10. Free Future Learn Course: Innovation – The Fashion Industry (approx 12hrs study time):https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/fashion-innovation
    Understand how big fashion retailers innovate and discover the story behind a favourite piece of your clothing. This course introduces a case study showing how Marks & Spencer has been a key innovator in fashion, introducing new fabrics that make our lives easier and more comfortable. You will see how M&S continues to drive innovation to bring consumers new and better products.
  11. For recommended Design related reading, research and information, look through the reading list etc on the A Level Fashion Textiles mindset page.

Department: Design and Technology – Product Design
Head of Department: Mrs Price
Contact email: aprice@mggs.org

Tasks (in priority order):
All tasks are described below and any additional resources required can be found in this folder.
Those marked with a * must be submitted to your class teacher when you start the A Level/Cambridge Technical course.

  1. * Complete a case study/biography of a designer who inspires you. Explain how and why their work has either already influenced you or may influence you as a designer in the future.
  2. * Watch this documentary by Zoe Laughlin on ‘How to Make’ focusing on an everyday item – the toothbrush. Choose another everyday item and re-design it, focusing on user needs, materials and functionality.
  3. Explore the Design Museum and V&A websites looking at any online exhibitions and the online shops and identify your top 5 principles of good design. (You may wish to look at the work of Dieter Rams for guidance.)
  4. Using the template, critically evaluate three products according to each of the 6Rs.  Consider carefully the link between each of the 6Rs and how they interlink.
  5. Listen to the Designed For Life podcast with Jude Pullen.
  6. If lockdown/COVID restrictions permit, visit one of the following design-related museum in London
    • Design Museum
    • V&A
    • Geffrye Museum
    • Wellcome Collection
    • Museum of the Home

    Take photographs to document your visit and summarise what you saw/learnt.

  7. For recommended Design related reading, research and information, look through the reading list etc on the A Level PD mindset page.

Department: Drama
Head of Department: Miss A-M Stanley
Contact email: astanley@mggs.org

Tasks (in priority order):
All tasks are described below and any additional resources required can be found in this folder.
Those marked with a * must be submitted to your class teacher when you start the A Level/Cambridge Technical course.

  1. *Research Task – Linked to Hedda Gabler (set text)
    Research the work of Konstantin Stanislavski and Henrik Ibsen. Compile a research project (approx 1000 words total but presented as creatively as you’d like) that answers the following questions:Konstantin Stanislavski:
    1. Who was he? Who was he influenced by?
    2. Why is he an important theatre practitioner?
    3. What is Naturalism? What theatre style was popular prior to Naturalism?
    4. What is the ‘System’? How is it useful?
    5. What is Realism? How does this differ from Naturalism?Henrik Ibsen:
    1. When was he born? Where did he live (he moved around a bit!)?
    2. What was life like in Norway in the late 19th century (1850 – 1900)?
    3. Which religion/beliefs were prevalent at this time?Honing in on Hedda Gabler…
    1. What were the different social classes in late 19th century Norway?
    2. What was expected of men and women in these different classes at this time? (What roles did they have? How should they have behaved? Were some things acceptable for men and not women? Was there a difference in expectation between different classes e.g. would the lower classes be able to do things the higher class couldn’t, or vice versa?
    3. Look at the living conditions of the upper classes in late 19th century Norway, particularly in the cities – include images of the interior of homes and the clothes they would have worn.
  2. *Physical Theatre Research Task:
    • What is physical theatre?
    • What are its origins/history?
    • Examples of three contemporary (20th/21st century) physical theatre companies and their work:
      • Their aims
      • Examples of past productions
      • Key features of their work e.g. puppetry, use of masks, lifts etc.
      • Include images to support your findings

    Examples of physical theatre companies: Frantic Assembly, Gecko, DV8, Complicite, Volcano are some of the more well-known ones but there are others that you could choose from.

    Create an A3 poster/presentation of some sort that contains information covering the above. This should be well presented as it may be used for a display. Include images and clear titles.

    Physical Theatre BBC Bitesize is a really good place to start.

    Most of the companies mentioned above also have their own websites and YouTube channels. Watch examples of their work to give you a feel for their style.

  3. *Live Theatre:
    Like the GCSE you will need to be able to write about plays that you have been to see as part of the written exam. It is also vital that you watch as much theatre as possible to help inspire your own practical work. It is important that you are exposed to different styles of theatre. Watch at least two productions that you haven’t seen before:Drama Online Library websiteUsername: 2Sc$7Lm*
    Password: 3Gd”8Qe-We would love to hear about anything that you have watched.
  4. Backstage Roles
    As with the GCSE it is important that you have a good understanding of the different roles and responsibilities of theatre makers. For both set texts you will be required to talk in a lot more detail about design elements. Start by looking at BBC Bitesize (set, lighting, sound, costume etc) and then Youtube e.g. National Theatre.If you are interested in finding out more about puppetry then watch these:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6zo9rWq2Zh8
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G_rlzZtU-q8
  5. Our Country’s Good ResearchOCG is the second text that we start to study towards the end of year 12.
    • Read An Introduction to Our Country’s Good
    • Find out about crime and punishment in 18th century Britain e.g the Bloody Code and transportation.
    • Collate research/key points and images of past productions of OCG.
  6. Katie Mitchell – practitionerKatie Mitchell is an innovative and challenging director and theatre practitioner.  In Year 13, we look at her work and use her style to guide the examiner assessed performances of monologues.
  7. PlayCrush Podcast
    Listen to interviews with theatre professionals.Royal Court Playwright’s Podcast
    Listen to playwright Simon Stephens talks to some of the world’s leading playwrights about their lives, their work, and their relationships with the Royal Court
  8. Modern Theatre
    Read this article about the evolution of modern theatrical production.
  9. Read a play a week with Nick Hern Books
    Download, read and then listen to Q&A podcast about the play of the week.
  10. Get moving
    Complete this movement class led by Angela Towler who is a former rehearsal director at Rambert Dance Company. Join in with the National Dance Company of Wales.

Department: Economics
Head of Department: Ms Robertson
Contact email: rrobertson@mggs.org

Tasks (in priority order):
All tasks are described below and any additional resources required can be found in this folder.
Those marked with a * must be submitted to your class teacher when you start the A Level course.

  1. Economics A Level Mindset
  2. * Research 4 famous economists and produce a poster to submit in September:Famous economists poster
  3. * Go through the presentation and then produce a poster evaluating the advantages and disadvantages of the 3 types of economies:Types of economies
  4. Watch the series of 3 documentary films ‘Commanding Heights’ detailed in the presentation above on types of economies and famous economists
  5. Keep up to date with current events by watching the news (eg BBC or Channel 4), and listening to Radio 4 (eg Today Program, The World at 1 or PM). This is a period of rapid change in government economic policy and will inform much of the content of your future economics lessons.
  6. Read the economics news every day from the quality press
    http://www.theguardian.com/uk/business
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business
    http://www.economist.com/
    http://www.ft.com/home/uk
  7. It is important to read widely around the A-Level subjects you are studying. Here is the Business & Economics recommended reading list

Department: English
Teachers: Ms Acheson and Mrs Marsh
Contact emails: jacheson@mggs.org / smarsh@mggs.org

Tasks (in priority order):
All tasks are described below and any additional resources required can be found in this folder.
Those marked with a * must be submitted to your class teacher when you start the A Level

  1. *Choose ONE of the attached supported tasks to complete:
    a] Analyisis of Angelina Jolie’s speech or
    b] Representation of hope – Make a copy of the following documents and fill them out: First, plan your analysis – Planning – compare and contrast map and then write a response Instructions for written response.
  2. *Complete the independent project attached
  3. *Read the following texts by the end of the summer: The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini and The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold
  4. Create an extended Parts of Speech glossary.
  5. Read as widely as possible, including:
    • fiction texts on the reading list attached
    • non-fiction texts, for example newspaper stories, magazine feature articles, autobiographies / memoirs, and blogs
  6. Here are some classic short stories that will broaden your horizons:
  7. Here are some high-quality pieces of non-fiction that will again, broaden your reading experience:‘The Fourth State of Matter’ by Jo Ann Beard,
    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/1996/06/24/the-fourth-state-of-matter
    This is a true story of a mass killing – so nonfiction – but told using fictional techniques. Beard worked as the editor of a space-physics monthly journal and was lucky not to have been present at the shootin