Transition Work for Students Joining Y12

Your MGGS 6th Form Journey Begins Here!

We are looking forward to welcoming you into the MGGS Sixth Form next academic year.

You have a valuable opportunity in the coming months to prepare for your A Level/Cambridge Technical qualifications, and we want to support you in this. The transition from Key Stage 4 to Key Stage 5 is challenging and, despite reducing the number of subjects you study considerably, the depth, breadth, quality and amount of work that you will do will increase. You will grow in your experience, expertise and love of these subjects and will make many happy memories while you’re in the Sixth Form; we are very proud of the community we share and the fantastic work ethic and achievements of our students. Sixth Form study is very different and the best way to ensure a smooth transition is to be ready.

The tasks below have been compiled by MGGS Heads of Department and the Sixth Form Management Team, and have been planned carefully to develop your skills and to enable you to ‘hit the ground running’ when you start your Sixth Form study. We usually release this material after our induction events in July but have chosen to release our transition material early in order that you can broaden your understanding of the subjects you plan to study in advance of the A Level/Cambridge Technical course. In light of the cancellation of examinations and the time you are now spending at home, we have also included lots of additional material – we do not expect anyone to complete all of it!  

First you will find a list of general tasks and advice – none of these are compulsory at this stage but looking through them will give you a good idea of our values and priorities as a school and help you to plan for your time with us.

Below the first table are a selection of tasks for each of our Key Stage 5 subjects for entry 2020.  Compulsory tasks, to be handed in during your first Y12 lessons, are marked with a *.  Other tasks are optional and offered as extra opportunities for development and extension. You can choose how many you undertake.

If you are considering a number of subjects, completing this work may help you to finalise your decision.

If you have any questions related to these tasks, please contact the relevant Head of Department or central@mggs.org. Thank you in advance for your hard work on this; we hope you enjoy it!

Mrs Ransom
Assistant Headteacher for Key Stage 5

1 Do something positive for your mental health and wellbeing

There is a lot that is useful out there, e.g. the Radio 1 Life Hacks podcast (https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/p0875218) which has an episode on mental health generally and one on school closures too.

2 Regularly review your GCSE work, especially in subjects you plan to continue (or related subjects, e.g. maths is relevant in Maths, Sciences, Social Sciences, Business, Economics, Computing, Geography and many more!)

Make sure you’ve finished the course and are secure in your knowledge. You’ll be building on this in KS5 and the knowledge you’ve gained from GCSE courses is an essential foundation for A levels, so make sure you stay on the ball and keep facts, methods and skills fresh in the run up to starting sixth form.

3 Consolidate your independent study skills:

MGGS Sixth Form follows a programme of activities devised by the VESPA Mindset team. Attached are some activities to get you started:

4 Fall in love with your subjects!

Cultivate your passion with super curricular reading. There are lots of good ideas for super curricular activities on Unifrog (if you have access to this through your current school, look at the ‘Geek Out’ section under your subject).

There are also great ideas on:
Staircase12 (University of Oxford) – https://www.univ.ox.ac.uk/applying-to-univ/staircase12/
Discover Downing (University of Cambridge) – http://www.discoverdowning.com/resources/
You might also be interested in Oxplore, which asks big questions to get you thinking – http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/undergraduate/increasing-access/oxplore

5 Podcasts

Find one you like and listen to it regularly to keep up to date in your subject(s). The MGGS Student Guide to Radio 4 may help.

6 One of the options for your Sixth Form Extra hours will be to take on some independent study. You can start this now! Look at the Future Learn courses and MOOCs and find one that is relevant to your future study or career. There are also some great boredom buster courses https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/collections/boredom-busters
7 The Open University has massively increased the number of free courses that are available on their website. This could be a good way to explore an area that you are planning (or considering!) to study in the future https://www.open.edu/openlearn/free-courses/full-catalogue
8 Start working on Post-16/18 careers:

  • Visit the National Careers Service for advice on particular pathways and to find out more about skills required in employment. https://nationalcareers.service.gov.uk/. Complete the skills assessment as a starting activity – this may then help you plan what to work on next.
  • Find out whether there is a professional body for your chosen field of work and check out their website including recent news and any relevant journals that they publish. If you are successful in your field you’ll be expected to be up to date, so get ahead while you have the time. Googling “professional body for x career” is a good place to start if you’re not sure. These sites will also let you know if your degree needs to be accredited or not. For example, any career within psychology will require registering with the BPS (British Psychological Society), and membership requires you to have an accredited psychology degree.
  • One of our top tips is always to join LinkedIn. Join LinkedIn and start making connections with industry professionals. As a keen and ambitious student everyone will want to connect with you if you’re polite and enthusiastic. Include messages with connection requests. Interact with content and keep your page up to date. The network you build here may serve your career long into the future (your classmates may go on to be big business tycoons in a range of fields, so don’t forget to connect to each other too).
9 If you are looking to learn a new skill, British Sign are offering a British Sign Language Course for only £3 to students- https://www.british-sign.co.uk/coronavirus-crisis/

The tasks below have been compiled by the relevant Head of Department and teachers and have been planned carefully to broaden your understanding of the subject to enable you to ‘hit the ground running’ when you start the A Level/Cambridge Technical course. If you have any questions related to these tasks, please contact the Head of Department using the email address detailed below.

Thank you in advance for your hard work on this; we hope you enjoy it!

Mrs Ransom

Department: Art (Art, Craft and Design)
Head of Department: Mrs Jenkins
Contact email: kjenkins@mggs.org

Tasks (in priority order):
All tasks are described below and any additional resources required can be found in this folder.
Those marked with a * must be submitted to your class teacher when you start the A Level/Cambridge Technical course.

  1. *Complete a ‘Lockdown Journal’ or sketchbook of photographs, drawings, thoughts, analysis and artist research which you find inspiring between now and the start of your course. You will find many artists have provided inspiration and resources online in order to give you ideas of work you can produce in the lockdown. You will use this work as inspiration in term 1 and 2 of Year 12 for the new processes you learn. Try to fill the sketchbook over the summer.
  2. Watch ‘Graysons Art Club’ and respond to some of his ideas.
  3. Look at First Site for your free Artist Activity Packs, put together by various famous artists. https://firstsite.uk/download-artist-activity-pack/
  4. Look at online exhibitions over the summer, as many of the great galleries have put their exhibitions/tours online. In fact, since the lockdown has been global we now have opportunity to visit international galleries shows online. Here are some links:
    The Art Newspaper article about exhibitions
    Free Art Magazines
    List of virtual days out

Department: Art (Graphic Communication)
Head of Department: Mrs Jenkins
Contact email: kjenkins@mggs.org

Tasks (in priority order):
All tasks are described below and any additional resources required can be found in this folder.
Those marked with a * must be submitted to your class teacher when you start the A Level/Cambridge Technical course.

  1. *Complete a ‘Lockdown Journal’ or sketchbook of photographs, drawings, thoughts, analysis and artist research which you find inspiring between now and the start of your course. Think carefully about the lettering of any text you include. You will find many artists have provided inspiration and resources online in order to give you ideas of work you can produce in the lockdown. You can use this as inspiration.
    Try to fill the sketchbook.
  2. Watch ‘Graysons Art Club’ and respond to some of his ideas.
  3. Look at First Site for your free Artist Activity Packs, put together by various famous artists. https://firstsite.uk/download-artist-activity-pack/
  4. Research hand lettering techniques and have a go yourself
  5. Research photo letters and have a go yourself.
  6. Try calligraphy – research first. You may need to use specialist pens if you have them.
  7. Create a stop motion animation.

Department: Biology
Head of Department: Ms Holder
Contact email: aholder@mggs.org

Tasks (in priority order):
All tasks are described below and any additional resources required can be found in this folder.
Those marked with a * must be submitted to your class teacher when you start the A Level/Cambridge Technical course.

  1. *Read document – Transition information – AQA complete all activities
  2. *Complete – Transition from GCSE to A level workbook
  3. Read The Biology A level Mindset and try some of the activities / reading. Print a copy for your folder
  4. Revise your GCSE Knowledge – there is a baseline test when you start
  5. Topical video at the moment: https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01nln7d
    Our secret universe: the hidden life of a cell
    Documentary exploring the inner world of the human cellular structure via the narrative of a viral infection from within the world of a single cell
  6. https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01f51z4
    Medical history series.

Department: Business
Head of Department: Mr Walker
Contact email: nwalker@mggs.org

Tasks (in priority order):
All tasks are described below and any additional resources required can be found in this folder.
Those marked with a * must be submitted to your class teacher when you start the A Level/Cambridge Technical course.

  1. * If you study Business at MGGS you’ll be better informed than the average person in the street about the big issues, such as enterprise and entrepreneurship. You’ll be encouraged to articulate your ideas and to distinguish between facts, bias and opinion.
    Task: Choose a successful entrepreneur to investigate
    Investigate and produce a report covering the following things:
    • Biography of entrepreneur eg age, background, etc
    • An overview of their entrepreneurial / businesses activities
    • The entrepreneurial characteristics you feel they show
    • Key events / activities that have made them successful
  2. Read the business news every day, noting the names of businesses and business leaders of interest.
    http://www.theguardian.com/uk/business
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business
    http://www.economist.com/
    http://www.ft.com/home/uk
  3. Identify at least five businesses of interest to you to follow on social media to keep up to date with their news. There are many to choose from in lots of different sectors, but try to choose a range (e.g. an entertainment business, a restaurant or coffee shop, a sports team or other business, a fashion retailer, a magazine/newspaper, an online business, a food retailer).
  4. Listen to a selection of business podcasts to find a favourite and then commit to listening regularly.
    We recommend:
    The Bottom Line (BBC Radio 4) – lots of episodes, one I enjoyed recently was The discounters.
    More or Less (BBC Radio 4)
    The Disrupters (BBC Radio 4)
    AQA Business podcasts
    Tutor2U
  5. Complete the Tutor2U Initial Numeracy Assessment for Business and self assess using the answers.
  6. It is important to read widely around the A-Level subjects you are studying. Here is the Business & Economics recommended reading list.

Department: Chemistry
Head of Department: Dr Doyle
Contact email: edoyle@mggs.org

Tasks (in priority order):
All tasks are described below and any additional resources required can be found in this folder.
Those marked with a * must be submitted to your class teacher when you start the A Level/Cambridge Technical course.

  1. *Start to organise a folder with dividers for the different topics to be studied (see the A level textbook on Kerboodle). Start a Glossary for A level Chemistry by researching the definition of key terms in the Chapter index in the A level Chemistry textbook.
  2. * Print and read the Chemistry A Level overview document here.
  3. * Complete the Maths skills sheet here; Amount of Substance.
  4. * Prepare for a pre-test during the 2nd lesson in September. This will cover GCSE Chemistry knowledge and the following Mathematical Skills (in row 7) that will be developed during the A level course. Overall, at least 20% of the marks in assessments for Chemistry will require the use of mathematical skills. These skills will be applied in the context of Chemistry and will be at least the standard of higher tier GCSE Mathematics.
  5. * Chemistry A Level Mindset – Read and print a copy for your folders. Use the links to develop your notes
  6. * Complete the practice exam question on the Welcome day practical sheet. Unfortunately, we have not been able to hold the Welcome Day lesson so please watch this overview here – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bd0A44Iv2OI.
  7. Support sheet for development of Standard form and Significant Figures

Department: Computer Science
Head of Department: Mrs Jebagnanam
Contact email: ajebagnanam@mggs.org

Tasks (in priority order):
All tasks are described below and any additional resources required can be found in this folder.
Those marked with a * must be submitted to your class teacher when you start the A Level/Cambridge Technical course.

  1. *Future Learn (www.futurelearn.com https://www.futurelearn.com/subjects/it-and-computer-science-courses)
    Future Learn website contains a number of online courses. There are online courses for beginners and novices all the way up to degree courses and courses that are accredited by universities. We have selected a few courses below that contain A-Level Computer Science content that you may like to explore. We recommend that you have a look at the contents of each of the below courses and choose at least one that meets your skills & interest level and complete the course.

      • Getting started with Python
      • Object-oriented Programming in Python: Create Your Own Adventure Game
      • Programming 103: Saving and Structuring Data
      • Programming 102: Think Like a Computer Scientist
      • Introduction to Web Development
      • Functional Programming in Haskell: Supercharge Your Coding
      • An Introduction to Cryptography
      • Introduction to Cyber Security

    Please hand in a screenshot or a certificate to show the completion of one of the courses above in your first lesson in Year 12

  2. *Learning Python**
    The programming language used in A-Level CS at MGGS is Python. So, it’s time to learn the language / strengthen your skills using TutorialsPoint
    https://www.tutorialspoint.com/python/index.htmAn introduction to Interactive Programming in Python – Coursera
    If you have not studied Computer Science for GCSE or have not worked with Python (programming language) before, then you should familiarise yourself with the basic syntax of the programming languageCoursera.org offers many such courses and one of the interactive ones is : An introduction to interactive programming with Python. This course is also suitable for students who have worked with Python before, and are interested in visual game building techniques as the tutorial gradually moves to teach you about Canvas and working with objects, detecting collision etc.https://www.coursera.org/learn/interactive-python-1?specialization=computer-fundamentals#about
    https://www.coursera.org/learn/interactive-python-2?specialization=computer-fundamentals
  3. Keep Current
    It is very important that Computer Science A-Level students are aware of all the latest developments in the technology field. Make sure you keep up to date with what is happening.https://uk.reuters.com/news/archive/technologyNews
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology
    http://news.mit.edu/
    https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/computing
    https://www.wired.co.uk/topic/technology
  4. TED Talks
    On TED.com is a bank of free knowledge from ‘the world’s most inspired thinkers’ — and a community of curious souls to engage with ideas and each other. There are a huge number of computing/technology related talks – you can also get these delivered to your inbox when they are released.Ted Talks – Technology filter: https://www.ted.com/talks?topics%5B%5D=technology
  5. The Computer Science A-Level requires you to be a competent programmer and problem solver. There are a number of online platforms that you can use to stretch and challenge your skills.Khan Academy https://www.khanacademy.org/computing
    The Khan Academy website has a section devoted to economics/business/finance courses. It is a website set up offering free courses and content.Codecademy https://www.codecademy.com/catalog/subject/all
    A range of courses set up by career path to give you the practical skills needed for specific job rolesW3Schools https://www.w3schools.com/
    The largest range of web development courses.
  6. Reading!
    One of the most important things you can do to prepare yourself for further study in Computer Science is to ensure that you are as widely read as possible. Exploring as many different texts on different areas/topics/views/eras as possible is going to put you in the best place possible for starting further study. With that in mind here is a reminder of the recommended Computer Science Reading List.

Department: Drama
Head of Department: Miss A-M Stanley
Contact email: astanley@mggs.org

Tasks (in priority order):
All tasks are described below and any additional resources required can be found in this folder.
Those marked with a * must be submitted to your class teacher when you start the A Level/Cambridge Technical course.

  1. *Research Task – Linked to Hedda Gabler (set text)
    Research the work of Constantine Stanislavski and Henrik Ibsen. Compile a research project (approx 1000 words total but presented as creatively as you’d like) that answers the following questions:Constantine Stanislavski:
    1. Who was he? Who was he influenced by?
    2. Why is he an important theatre practitioner?
    3. What is Naturalism? What theatre style was popular prior to Naturalism?
    4. What is the ‘System’? How is it useful?
    5. What is Realism? How does this differ from Naturalism?Henrik Ibsen:
    1. When was he born? Where did he live (he moved around a bit!)?
    2. What was life like in Norway in the late 19th century (1850 – 1900)?Honing in on Hedda Gabler…
    1. What were the different social classes in late 19th century Norway?
    2. What was expected of men and women in these different classes at this time? (What roles did they have? How should they have behaved? Were some things acceptable for men and not women? Was there a difference in expectation between different classes e.g. would the lower classes be able to do things the higher class couldn’t, or vice versa?
    3. Look at the living conditions of the upper classes in late 19th century Norway, particularly in the cities – include images of the interior of homes and the clothes they would have worn.
  2. *Physical Theatre Research Task:
    • What is physical theatre?
    • What are its origins/history?
    • Examples of three contemporary physical theatre companies and their work:
      • Their aims
      • Examples of past productions
      • Include images to support your findings

    Examples of physical theatre companies: Frantic Assembly, Gecko, DV8, Complicite, Volcano are some of the more well known ones but there are others that you could choose from.

    Create an A3 poster that contains information covering the above. This should be well presented as it may be used for a display. Include images and clear titles.

    BBC Bitesize is a really good place to start: https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/guides/ztfk6sg/revision/1

    Most of the companies mentioned above also have their own websites and YouTube channels. Watch examples of their work to give you a feel for their style.

  3. *Live Theatre:
    Like the GCSE you will need to be able to write about plays that you have been to see as part of the written exam. It is also vital that you watch as much theatre as possible to help inspire your own practical work. It is important that you are exposed to different styles of theatre. Watch at least two plays before September. There is lots out there but here are a couple of suggestions:The National Theatre
    Every Thursday throughout May/June, a new play will premiere on YouTube at 7pm, available to watch for free, for a week.Wise Children directed by Emma Rice is currently on BBC iPlayer and will then move to the Wise Children website.We would love to hear about anything that you have watched.
  4. Design and Technical Roles
    As with the GCSE it is important that you have a good understanding of the different roles and responsibilities of theatre makers. YouTube has lots of videos to help you gain a more in depth knowledge and understanding of set, lighting, sound, costume and puppetry. For both set texts you will be required to talk in a lot more detail about design elements:Again BBC Bitesize is a good place to start:
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/examspecs/zrnjwtyThe National Theatre’s YouTube channel is also excellent.
  5. Our Country’s Good Research
    OCG is the second text that we start to study towards the end of year 12.

  6. Katie Mitchell – practitioner
    Katie Mitchell is an innovative and challenging director and theatre practitioner. In Year 13, we look at her work and use her style to guide the examiner assessed performances of monologues.

  7. Modern Theatre
    Read this an article about the evolution of modern theatrical production: https://www.britannica.com/art/theater-building/The-evolution-of-modern-theatrical-production
  8. Read a play a week with Nick Hern Books
    Read and then listen to Q&A podcast about the play of the week: https://www.nickhernbooks.co.uk/playgroup
  9. Get creative
    Get involved with ‘Windows to the World’ run by Kneehigh Theatre Company. A daily creative challenge will be uploaded at 9am every day: https://www.kneehigh.co.uk/windows/
  10. Get moving
    Complete this movement class led by Angela Towler who is a former rehearsal director at Rambert Dance Company. Join in with the National Dance Company of Wales: https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/l0026gtf/national-dance-company-wales-morning-class

Department: Economics
Head of Department: Ms Robertson
Contact email: rrobertson@mggs.org

Tasks (in priority order):
All tasks are described below and any additional resources required can be found in this folder.
Those marked with a * must be submitted to your class teacher when you start the A Level course.

  1. Economics A Level Mindset
  2. * Research 4 famous economists and produce a poster to submit in September:Famous economists poster
  3. * Go through the presentation and then produce a poster evaluating the advantages and disadvantages of the 3 types of economies:Types of economies
  4. Watch the series of 3 documentary films ‘Commanding Heights’ detailed in the presentation above on types of economies and famous economists
  5. Keep up to date with current events by watching the news (eg BBC or Channel 4), and listening to Radio 4 (eg Today Program, The World at 1 or PM). This is a period of rapid change in government economic policy and will inform much of the content of your future economics lessons.
  6. Read the economics news every day from the quality presshttp://www.theguardian.com/uk/business
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business
    http://www.economist.com/
    http://www.ft.com/home/uk
  7. It is important to read widely around the A-Level subjects you are studying. Here is the Business & Economics recommended reading list

Department: English
Teachers: Ms Acheson and Mrs Marsh
Contact emails: jacheson@mggs.org / smarsh@mggs.org

Tasks (in priority order):
All tasks are described below and any additional resources required can be found in this folder.
Those marked with a * must be submitted to your class teacher when you start the A Level

  1. *Choose ONE of the attached supported tasks to complete:a] Analyisis of Angelina Jolie’s speech or
    b] Representation of hope – Copy and paste the An investigation into the representation of hope in Emily Dickinson’s ‘Hope is the thing with feathers’ and a post by Chris Lynam part 1 and part 2 pdfs onto a document and fill them out:
    First, plan your analysis – Planning – compare contrast map – and then, part 2, write a response using the instructions for written response
  2. *Complete the independent project following the instructions on the External students A Level English Language and Literature Independent Project pdfLiterature Independent Project pdf
  3. *Read the following texts by the end of the summer: The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini and The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold
  4. Create an extended Parts of Speech glossary. Use the parts of speech pdf to help you get started.
  5. Read as widely as possible, including:
    • fiction texts on the reading list
    • non-fiction texts, for example newspaper stories, magazine feature articles, autobiographies / memoirs, and blogs
  6. Here are some classic short stories that will broaden your horizons:
    ‘The Last Leaf’ by O Henry
    http://www.eastoftheweb.com/short-stories/UBooks/LasLea.shtml
    O Henry was very famous for a kind of short story that involved a twist at the end. This is arguably his best piece and an excellent example of the style.‘The Gift of the Magi’ by O Henry
    http://www.eastoftheweb.com/short-stories/UBooks/GifMag.shtml
    This is a famous Christmas story and also involves a twist at the end.‘A Worn Path’ by Eudora Welty
    http://www.eastoftheweb.com/short-stories/UBooks/GifMag.shtml
    This story was first published in 1931 and is about an old, black woman in the American south. It so impressed a computer scientist who read it as part of his college course that he named the operating system he was working on ‘Eudora’.
  7. Here are some high-quality pieces of non-fiction that will again, broaden your reading experience:‘The Fourth State of Matter’ by Jo Ann Beard,
    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/1996/06/24/the-fourth-state-of-matter
    This is a true story of a mass killing – so nonfiction – but told using fictional techniques. Beard worked as the editor of a space-physics monthly journal and was lucky not to have been present at the shooting of her co-workers by a student.‘An Unbelievable Story of Rape’ by Ken Armstrong and T Christian Miller,
    https://www.themarshallproject.org/2015/12/16/an-unbelievable-story-of-rape
    This is the article that the Netflix series was based on. Investigative journalists Armstrong and Miller researched and wrote up this fascinating case. The research and writing process was sponsored by ProPublica and The Marshall Project, non-for-profit organisations that support high quality journalism.‘Shooting An Elephant’ by George Orwell,
    https://www.orwellfoundation.com/the-orwell-foundation/orwell/essays-and-other-works/shooting-an-elephant/
    Orwell was a police officer in Burma in the 1930s. The story is both a literal account of the shooting of an elephant and metaphorically, a statement about the nature of colonialism and British rule.‘A Hanging’ by George Orwell,
    https://orwell.ru/library/articles/hanging/english/e_hanging
    As the name suggests, this is an account of a hanging; Orwell uses fictional techniques to present the horror of an execution.Read any feature articles in a magazine or newspaper for example The Guardian’s ‘long read’ sectionClick here to go to The Guardian long read section When you are reading, think about the following:

    • What information is objective and impersonal?
    • What information is subjective and more personal?
    • How does the writer use structure or perspective or vocabulary to express a point of view? How are you being positioned as a reader / viewer?
  8. Listen to interesting speakers on YouTube.The School of Life has a great range of introductory videos to a range of writers (fifteen in total). School of Life – Literature curriculumNerdwriter and The Take are two other sites that have an interesting range of videos relating to media and cultural studies. Check them out at Nerdwriter homepage and The Take homepage.
  9. You should regularly watch the news with your family and discuss current affairs. Find out who holds the following positions: Prime Minister, Chancellor, Home Secretary and Foreign Secretary. Find out the name of the leader of the Green Party, the Liberal Democrats, the Labour Party and the Conservative Party.You may be eligible to vote in Year 13 and you will certainly be able to vote when you leave school. Enrol to vote when you are able. Find out about the policies of the major parties. Which party would you vote for in an election? Find out what party the adults in your family support and ask them why.

Department: English Literature
Head of Department: Miss Greenwood
Acting Head: Miss Calvert
Contact email: ngreenwood@mggs.org / kcalvert@mggs.org

Tasks (in priority order):
All tasks are described below and any additional resources required can be found in this folder.
Those marked with a * must be submitted to your class teacher when you start the A Level/Cambridge Technical course.

  1. *Buy a copy of Shakespeare’s ‘Othello’ and ‘The Taming of the Shrew’ – you should get the Arden Shakespeare editions. Read them both. You will be studying at least one of these texts but you should have a working knowledge of both plays.
  2. *Buy a copy of Charlotte Brontë’s novel, ‘Jane Eyre’ in the Penguin edition and a copy of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s ‘The Great Gatsby’ in the Oxford World Classics edition and read them both. Again, you may be studying either text but we would like you to have read both for a working knowledge of them.
  3. *The purpose of your A Level course is to read widely. Use the suggested A Level reading list to read as much as you can, but ensure that you have read at least one pre-1900 and one post-1900 text and focus on aspects of love and relationships in these texts.
  4. *Your task is to write a comparison of your two chosen texts (none of the four mentioned above) comparing the two texts in terms of how they present love and relationships. It should be between 2 and 3 pages long. Bring this to your first lesson and be prepared to share the texts that you
    have read and written about in discussion.
  5. Recommended work: watch some Shakespeare and other drama. In the likely event that you will not be able to go to the theatre and see a play before now and September, you should look at the RSC and National Theatre online sites – they are currently streaming plays and have a lot that you can watch for free. Modern film adaptations of the core texts are also a good idea to buy and watch to help you understand them.
  6. Keep a reading journal: as well as what you have been asked to read here, keep a journal of any reading that you do over the long vacation and make notes on what you enjoyed / found interesting about a text’s characters, style, plot and key themes. It would be a good place to write quotations that you particularly liked. You don’t have to focus exclusively on ‘love and relationships’ here but it would be a good idea to keep an eye out for how this theme is portrayed in any text you look at – the more you have encountered in relation to this theme, the better.
  7. Get a subscription to emag or The English Review. You can get one through the school but it is better to order your own copies. This is a really useful resource with lots of articles on A Level texts and advice about writing essays and engaging with literature. I prefer The English Review but it’s entirely up to you. Both have websites that you can find out more on, and downloadable resources. Start reading more critical sources on texts that you have read as well: MASSOLIT is an excellent site to go to to watch lectures on key literary texts. Put Maidstone Grammar School For Girls as your institution and then it will prompt you to create your own login details.
  8. Listen to a podcast regularly: there are lots of literary ones out there. Audible is a particularly good app to listen to books on as well. In Our Time on Radio 4 has lots of literary segments that you can listen to on different authors, and it’s really interesting: In Our Time episodes

Department: French
Head of Department: Mrs Bassett
Contact email: sbassett@mggs.org

Tasks (in priority order):
All tasks are described below and any additional resources required can be found in this folder.
Those marked with a * must be submitted to your class teacher when you start the A Level/Cambridge Technical course.

  1. * Join the google classroom you have been invited to (code: 2ej5sfv) and create the folders as per the instructions on classroom. Complete the first two grammar assignments (due date: 01/09).
  2. * Regularly check the material posted on Google Classroom for vocabulary learning and spend time learning the relevant vocabulary. Print off the lists from quizlet.com (posted on classroom)
  3. Download the app 20minutes on your phone – try to read at least one article per day and write a quick summary of what you have understood as well as your opinion on the subject. Keep all your summaries together in one section of your folder (name the section “independent reading”)
  4. Get into French speaking music and start doing some research on French speaking music artists. The usual music websites or apps such as spotify, amazon or youtube are good sources.
  5. Get into French cinema and watch films (with or without subtitles). Write a summary and a review of what you have seen. You can find a variety of films and series on Netflix or Amazon if you are members already. Youtube is also full of films for free
  6. *Research monuments that are on the Unesco list of Cultural Heritage – use this link: http://whc.unesco.org/fr/list/arb
    Choose your favourite one(s) and present in a slideshow – post on the classroom
  7. *Visit this website http://www.tv5monde.com/
    Find something that interests you – write about what you read/saw/listened to and share it with SBA
  8. If possible, buy the workbook for year 12 https://www.hoddereducation.co.uk/subjects/languages/products/16-18/aqa-a-level-french-revision-and-practice-workb-(1)
  9. Go on Quizlet and practice some of the A level vocabulary

Linked Documents:

Department: Mathematics
Head of Department: Mrs Squibb
Contact email: ssquibb@mggs.org

Tasks (in priority order):
All tasks are described below and any additional resources required can be found in this folder.
Those marked with a * must be submitted to your class teacher when you start the A Level/Cambridge Technical course.

  1. You will all be studying maths so make sure that you have practiced all the skills on the Maths page
  2. * There is an induction booklet for Further Maths which is attached here. Make sure that you have completed it by the start of September so that you are well prepared for September

Department: Geography
Head of Department: Miss Cakebread
Contact email: ccakebread@mggs.org

Tasks (in priority order):
All tasks are described below
Those marked with a * must be submitted to your class teacher when you start the A Level/Cambridge Technical course.

  1. Once a Geographer always a Geographer – The Keep learning Geography PDF document has a number of resources to help you stay engaged in Geography over the coming months. It includes things to read, watch, listen to, news links and interesting websites. Please engage with as many of these as you can as it will help you develop your geographical knowledge and understanding that you can then apply to A Level Geography
  2. * Look at the Geography log PDF and create a copy and then every time you do some work you can add to this and create a detailed log of everything that you are doing related to Geography. This can then be bought with you to your first lesson and handed in to Miss Cakebread
  3. ‘Young Geographer of the Year’ competition run by the Royal Geographical Society opens very soon, this would be a really good competition to enter. Details can be found here. Specifics of the competition will not be released until April so keep checking back on the website.
  4. Ted Talks are really good to watch. Here is a link for Geography related ones. Geography ted talks give you a wide variety of ones to choose from.
  5. * When studying Geography at A Level there are times you will be using Maths. This maths for Geographers is from the exam board which you can read through and it gives you information about the maths included in the A level. There is also the Maths Skills for Geographers PDF information page which gives you links to practice a range of maths skills.
  6. Looking at free online courses is also a good use of time this website https://www.futurelearn.com/subjects/nature-and-environment-courses takes you to a page with over 60 different Geography related courses that may be of interest to you. If you complete one make sure you add it to your Geography log and let the Geography department know how it went!

Department: German
Head of Department: Frau Gibson
Contact email: hgibson@mggs.org

Tasks (in priority order):
All tasks are described below and any additional resources required can be found in this folder.
Those marked with a * must be submitted to your class teacher when you start the A Level/Cambridge Technical course.

  1. * Please keep a log of all the work you complete before you start in September: see the pdf file entitled Task 1 – Language Learning Log
  2. * Work your way through the booklet of all the essential grammar you will need to be secure on before starting A level. It is called Task 2 – German A-Level – Bridging unit
    http://www.dartmouth.edu/~deutsch/Grammatik/Grammatik.html This college website has an extensive array of explanations and interactive exercises for you to practise on. You could also go to the Resources section of the Higher AQA GCSE Kerboodle book (if it is available to you) and filter grammar interactive and work through those. Kerboodle is offering free access to all at the moment so look up how to access it if you need more practice with grammar.
  3. * Work your way through the ‘Bridging the Gap’ activities listed under ‘Task 3 – Bridging the Gap (Bridging the Gap – Part 1, Bridging the Gap – Part 2)’. You can use the answer section to mark your answers as you go.
  4. Practise your listening skills by watching TV/ films/ Netflix etc in German, by listening to podcasts or just listening to music- Check out lots of links here.
  5. Practise your speaking skills by talking to one another in German and you could also work your way through the GCSE speaking exercises.
  6. You could get into some literature by working through the Higher activities in the Literature pack in the same folder as tasks 4 and 5 or read along and listen to a story: https://www.thegermanproject.com/stories

Department: Social Science
Head of Department: Ms Williams
Contact email: lwilliams@mggs.org

Tasks (in priority order):
All tasks are described below and any additional resources required can be found in this folder.
Those marked with a * must be submitted to your class teacher when you start the A Level/Cambridge Technical course.

  1. * Read Health and Social Care FAQs and related documents. Print out if possible and keep all documents in a folder.
  2. Familiarise yourself with the organisation of the Health and Social Care sector and a range of occupations within those sectors.
  3. * Familiarise yourself with Radio 4 ’Inside Health’ programme:https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b019dl1b/episodes/playerListen to at least one episode and write a short summary of what it was about.
  4. * Follow the instructions on ‘Living with Disability’ to create a post or leaflet about living with the disorder of your choice. Make sure you are using UK websites to research the help available.
  5. Watch some of the excellent TED talks on this topic:https://www.ted.com/talks?topics%5B%5D=health+care
  6. There are lots of good – if often harrowing – documentaries based on the care sector. Panorama investigations are definitely worth watching:https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/m0005jpf/panorama-crisis-in-care-part-1-who-cares
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/m0005qqr/panorama-crisis-in-care-part-2-who-pays
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/m00059qb/panorama-undercover-hospital-abuse-scandal‘Kids on the Edge’ is about children and young people being cared for by the Tavistock clinic: https://tavistockandportman.nhs.uk/about-us/kids-edge-channel-4-documentary/If you have Netflix, ‘Babies’ is well worth a watch.
  7. There are plenty of novels and films about healthcare. Novels include Elizabeth is Missing by Emma Healey (also available on iPlayer); The Children Act by Ian McEwan; The Curious Incident… by Mark Haddon. There are also lots of memoirs about addictions and mental health issues: for example see https://bookriot.com/2019/05/08/memoirs-about-mental-illness/

Department: History
Head of Department: Miss T Farrington
Contact email: tfarrington@mggs.org

Tasks (in priority order):
All tasks are described below and any additional resources required can be found on the MGGS website.
Those marked with a * must be submitted to your class teacher when you start the A Level/Cambridge Technical course.

  1. Watch the videos at this link for an introduction into good extended writing
  2. * A-level history requires you to combine lots of skills from GCSE into one answer. We would like you to produce an example of your historical written ability. See belowa) Choose your favourite topic from GCSE History create an essay style question using the following question stem:X was the most important/effective reason for Y. How far do you agree? Explain your answerb) Write the first paragraph of your answer. You should for 9 – 12 sentences and include the following:
    • A judgement
    • Precise and relevant historical detail
    • Explanation
    • Analysis – that shows how the evidence directly answers the question

    Example questions

    1. War and Violence was the most effective form of protest in Britain between the years 1170 and 1900. How far do you agree?
    2. The Great Depression was the most important reason for the increase in support for the NSDAP between the years 1929 and 1932. How far do you agree?
    3. Good leadership was the most important reason for the outcome of the Spanish Armada. How far do you agree?
    4. The Domino theory was the main reason the involvement of the USA in conflict in Asia between the years 1950 and 1975. How far do you agree?
  3. *
    1. Find a definition of the American West.
    2. Read this extract of the American Frontier
    3. Bullet point down the author’s views on how the American West was formed. (aim for ½ an A4 page)

    (This forms an introduction to Unit 2: The USA in the 19th Century: Westward expansion and Civil War 1803–c1890)

  4. * Using the Family Tree PDF answer the following questions about King Henry VII*
    1. What side of the family did Henry VII belong to?
    2. Who was Henry VIIs mother?
    3. Who did Henry VII replace as King? How were they related?
    4. How was Henry VII related to King Edward III?
    5. Who did Henry VII marry? Why is this significant?
    6. Can you identify anyone who had a stronger claim to the throne than Henry VII (upon the death of Richard III)

    (This forms an introduction to Unit 1: The Early Tudors 1485 – 1558)

  5. Complete this MOOC on the Tudors
    (This forms an introduction to Unit 1: The Early Tudors 1485 – 1558)

Department: Mathematics
Head of Department: Mrs Squibb
Contact email: ssquibb@mggs.org

Tasks (in priority order):
All tasks are described below and any additional resources required can be found in this folder.
Those marked with a **** must be submitted to your class teacher when you start the A Level/Cambridge Technical course.

Here are the details for all the work we are going to be doing over the next few weeks.

The work is all based on topics from the GCSE that form the basis for the A level.

Many of them are also sections of topics in the A level.

Your mastery of these topics will enable you to focus on challenging questions & new aspects when you start your A level. It should ensure that you are supremely well prepared in September.

There is no non-calculator paper in the A level but questions can be worded as “show that” or “prove” to ensure that you have to show steps in your working. Be aware of this from the start and become comfortable with what your calculator can do and also with the reasoning behind it.

For each topic I have made a list of resources you should use, taken from Mymaths, Dr Frost & Corbettmaths. Much of it will be recapping things you already know but there will also be a few parts that are extension. You may well be able to find other useful resources. Examsolutions videos are very clear.

I suggest that you

  1. Read the details of what is included for the week – at the top of each page
  2. look at each link, moving through lessons/videos quickly, glancing at parts you are sure you are confident with
  3. read /watch in more detail & try questions where you need to
  4. ask questions whenever you need to – emailing me or your maths teacher is the quickest way to a response
  5. Pick a mixture of easy, the most challenging questions to try to make sure you are confident

I have planned a topic per week since 20 April but you may choose to spend a longer or shorter time according to your needs. Once you are confident try the assessment. Mark it and review any questions that are incorrect.

ASK QUESTIONS! There will inevitably be many times when you need to ask a question to be certain that you understand a detail or can answer a question. Go ahead and ask us. It is one of the most rewarding aspects of our job and the single thing you can do that will have the most impact. Students who ask questions tend to do well; those who do not can find themselves getting further & further behind. ASK QUESTIONS!

At the bottom of the list of tasks you will find the Summer holiday work that we set each year. There is a lot of work in it and we advise that you answer every question, yes -even the really easy ones – to make sure that you really are confident in all the techniques. In the first week or so of term 1 you will sit an Induction Test based on it. The pass mark is 75%. You should have no problem achieving that if you have completed all the work on this page so my only
advice on completing it is to leave some to do in the week before term 1 starts to get your head back into “maths mode” after the summer holiday. (There may still be a very few errors in the answers. Email queries if you think you have found one)

FINALLY – this a lot to take in all at once but you could be the best prepared cohort of students to start the A level course. We are all looking forward to working with you and taking you on a journey through some of the Maths topics that have changed the world. I look forward to meeting you on that journey and to answering your many questions.

Mrs Squibb

MyMaths login
maidstone formula

Here is a resource you may find helpful

http://fdslive.oup.com/www.oup.com/oxed/secondary/maths/HomeLearning-Pack_A-Level-Bridging_Algebra_Contents-page.pdf?region=uk

  1. Week 1 rearranging equations
    Rearranging equations
    Rearranging assessment
  2. Week 2 Factorising
    Factorising
    Factorising assessment
  3. Week 3 Functions
    Functions
    Functions assessment – omit first 3 questions
  4. Week 4 Quadratics
    Quadratics inc sketching
  5. Week 5 Cubics
    Cubics
    Cubics assessment
  6. Week 6 Solving simultaneous equations
    Simultaneous equations
    Simultaneous equations assessment
  7. Week 7 Inequalities
    Inequalities
  8. Week 8 Equations of straight lines
    Equations of straight lines
    Equations of straight lines assessment
  9. Week 9 Algebraic fractions
    Algebraic Fractions
  10. Week 10 Algebraic proof
    Algebraic proof
    Algebraic proof assessment
  11. Week 11 Trig graphs
    Trig graphs and solving trig equations
    Trig graphs & equations assessment
  12. Week 12 Solving trig equations – links in week 11
  13. **** Compulsory Summer holiday work. This link is to the summer transition work that we set each year. You will need to look through it and decide which parts you will just be able to do and which you will need to do more work on. Do them in reverse order of difficulty leaving the easiest to do in August so that you get back into the habit of doing maths ready for returning to school in September. Full instructions are in the booklet.
  14. Watch talks on Learn Lounge https://learn.springpod.co.uk/#
    Rob Eastaway is a mathematician.

Department: Media Studies
Head of Department: Mrs Smith
Contact email: hsmith@mggs.org

Tasks (in priority order):
All tasks are described below and any additional resources required can be found in this folder.
Those marked with a * must be submitted to your class teacher when you start the A Level/Cambridge Technical course.
Tasks 1-6 are all taken from the powerpoint in this folder so you must use the powerpoint alongside this list.

  1. Using the Powerpoint (PDF file) to help you, make a list of how print media products communicate meanings to audiences.
  2. Analyse one of the posters in the powerpoint (from slides 7-10) making sure that you cover written, technical and visual codes.
  3. Watch the TV advert on slide 17 of the powerpoint 3 times. Analyse the advert using the table on slide 16 to help you. You should cover audio, technical and visual codes.
  4. * Choose an advertising campaign and analyse a print advert and a TV advert from that campaign. Additional help is on slide 18.
  5. * Produce a print advert for a new advertising campaign. Additional help is on slide 18 of the powerpoint.
  6. Watch the video on slide 19 and make notes about how advertising agencies are run.
  7. Keep up to date with the news via BBC News.
  8. Read through the document (Leap into Media – produced by the English and Media Centre) and complete the activities.

Task 1: Fundamental physics poster

Fundamental particles – the universe is made of a number of fundamental particles – 6 quarks and 6 leptons and their anti-particles. Find the names, properties and family structure of these particles. What is the internal structure of a proton and a neutron?

Fundamental forces – physics is the study of interactions or forces. Find the names of the 4 fundamental forces and describe the situations where each force would act. Rank them in order of strength

Produce a poster for display on fundamental particles and forces

Task 2: Prefixes and base units

Find and define all commonly used prefixes e.g. kilo (k) and include their value (103) in standard form. HINT: there are 10 that are commonly used

There are a number of base quantities and base units that are used in physics. Find out which are the base quantities and their units

Express the following units in terms of base units: coulomb, newton, joule, watt, pascal, and volt (e.g. the unit of density is expressed as kgm-3 – this is already expressed in base units)

HINT: if you are struggling find a simple equation that can help you break down the units e.g. F = ma

Physics – A level physics transition worksheet
Physics – A level transition test
Physics – A level transition test mark scheme
Physics – A level transition answers

Department: Government and Politics
Head of Department: Miss T Farrington
Contact email: tfarrington@mggs.org / jwilkins@mggs.org

Tasks (in priority order):
All tasks are described below and any additional resources required can be found in this folder.
Those marked with a * must be submitted to your class teacher when you start the A Level/Cambridge Technical course.

  1. Read page 3 of Politics Dictionary. Create a glossary of words that you are unfamiliar with, by putting the definitions into your own words.
  2. Complete task one of the transition booklet
  3. * Complete task two of the transition booklet
  4. * Complete task three of the transition booklet
  5. OPTIONAL: Set up and follow key political people on social media (see task four of transition booklet for more detail)

Department: Social Sciences
Head of Department: Ms Williams
Contact email: lwilliams@mggs.org

Tasks (in priority order):
All tasks are described below and any additional resources required can be found in this folder.
Those marked with a * must be submitted to your class teacher when you start the A Level/Cambridge Technical course.

  1. * Read the Psychology FAQs and related documents
    Psychology FAQs
    Psychology Generic mark scheme for essays
    Psychology Mathematical Requirements Y1
    Psychology Year 1 Progress Record
  2. Sign up to the British Psychology Digest (BPS)
  3. Watch the first two episodes of Crash Course Psychology:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vo4pMVb0R6MThis is quite stretching but is good general background
  4. * Find out about the history of Psychology, and answer the questions on ‘The History of Pyschology’ sheet
  5. * Familiarise yourself with Radio 4’s ‘All in the Mind’ serie:https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b006qxx9/episodes/playerListen to at least one archived programme and write a brief synopsis of what it covers
  6. Catch up with some of the fantastic documentaries covering Psychological topics. ‘Three Identical Strangers’ is now free to view on All4. If you have Netflix, ‘Babies’ is well worth watching. The ‘Real Stories’ series on YouTube have some good episodes:https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=real+stories+psychology.There are lots of others available – see for example the list here: https://topdocumentaryfilms.com/category/psychology/
  7. Watch some TED talks: https://www.ted.com/talks?sort=newest&topics%5B%5D=psychology
  8. Take the opportunity to read around the subject. Some suggested titles (from the Mindset document) include:Opening Skinner’s Box- Lauren Slater; 50 Psychology Classics- Tom Butler-Bowden; The Blank Slate-Stephen Pinker (and anything else he has written); Classic Case Studies in Psychology- Geoff Rolls; The Emerging Mind- V S Ramachandran; Why We Sleep – Matthew Walker; Sapiens – Yuval Harari.

Department: Religious Studies
Head of Department: Mr Wilson
Contact email: Mr Wilson: rwilson@mggs.org Miss Johnson: rojohnson@mggs.org

Tasks (in priority order):
All tasks are described below and any additional resources required can be found in this folder.
Those marked with a * must be submitted to your class teacher when you start the A Level/Cambridge Technical course.

  1. * Compulsory Religious Studies summer work – AnthologyOpen the Anthology Work PDF and read the instructions about required reading and activities that you need to complete before your course begins in September.The anthology can be found here:
    https://qualifications.pearson.com/content/dam/pdf/A%20Level/Religious%20Studies/2016/Specification%20and%20sample%20assessments/GCE2016_AL_ReligStd_Anthology.pdfUse this link to help you with the Philosophy of Religion work https://philosophydungeon.weebly.com/copleston–russell.htmlUse this link to help with the Ethics work: https://kaa.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Situation-Ethics-Anthology-ZigZag.pdf
  2. * RS A Level Edexcel Specification
    Click on the specification link above. Print (if you can) and read pages 9-20 – Philosophy of Religion, pages 21-27 – Religion and Ethics, pages 43-49 4B Christianity. Organise a folder into three sections and begin to understand the nature of the course.
  3. * Attributes of God Worksheet
    Complete the attributes of God definitions worksheet. Your task is to find out what each of the following mean and to record these in your notes. You should also spend some time thinking about any difficulties or problems that might arise in relation to these attributes e.g. If God is omnipotent, then why does God not do something about suffering? Be prepared to raise and discuss these questions at the start of your A Level course.
  4. * What is Religion? Video link
    Click on the link and watch the video via youtube. How has religion changed and developed over time? Why is it significant in societies?Think carefully about how religion can be defined in many different ways – sociologically, philosophically etc. Find out the following scholars’ definitions of religion: Émile Durkheim, Sigmund Freud, William James, Ninian Smart and Paul Tillich. Which one do you agree with the most? Why? Create your own definition.
  5. Watch some TED talks to investigate specific questions and ideas related to Religion and Philosophy:https://www.ted.com/topics/religion
    https://www.ted.com/topics/philosophy
  6. The main three areas for your RS A Level are: Philosophy of Religion, Religion and Ethics and Christianity. Find out more about each of these areas by clicking on the following links:https://www.reonline.org.uk/subject-knowledge/16-plus-philosophy/
    https://www.reonline.org.uk/subject-knowledge/16-ethics/
    https://www.reonline.org.uk/subject-knowledge/16-plus-christianity
  7. RS A Level example exam questions
    We will be teaching you about the new A Level examination style questions in the lesson but it is good to be aware of how you are assessed beforehand. The ‘assess’ questions are probably most similar to your 12 mark ‘evaluate’ GCSE style questions. Have a go at some of the ‘explore’ and ‘assess’ questions after you have completed some of the activities above. Explore the Edexcel RS A Level website to have a look at some exemplar answers.
  8. RS A Level Reading List
    We are aware that during these difficult times it is tricky to get hold of books but you might be able to view some online (google books). On the list the ones marked with a * are available to view on the Edexcel website as extracts as part of your anthology (see task 1)
  9. Keep up to date about religion in the news: https://www.theguardian.com/world/religion

Department: Social Science
Head of Department: Ms Williams
Contact email: lwilliams@mggs.org

Tasks (in priority order):
All tasks are described below and any additional resources required can be found in this folder.
Those marked with a * must be submitted to your class teacher when you start the A Level/Cambridge Technical course.

  1. * Read the Sociology FAQs and related documents. Print copies if possible and keep in folder
    Sociology FAQs
    Sociology Year 1 Progress Record
    Sociology Mindset Form
  2. * Watch the first two episodes of ‘Crash Course Sociology’:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YnCJU6PaCioSummarise their contents
  3. * Familiarise yourself with BBC R4’s ‘Thinking Allowed’:https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b006qy05/episodes/playerListen to at least one episode and write a brief summary of the programme contents.
  4. Familiarise yourself with some key statistics about the UK, using the Office for National Statistics website:https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/populationandmigration/populationestimates/articles/overviewoftheukpopulation/august2019
  5. * Complete the questions on ‘Power and Inequality in the UK
  6. Have a look at some TED talks: https://www.ted.com/talks?topics%5B%5D=sociology
  7. There are lots of interesting and relevant documentaries to watch. Real Stories on YouTube have several relevant categories:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCu4XcDBdnZkV6-5z2f16M0g/playlistsSee also: https://www.learnoutloud.com/Free-Documentaries/Social-Sciences/Sociology/2#go
  8. As instructed in the FAQs, make sure you follow national news in a quality paper or website. Focus particularly on stories about Education, Families, Religion and Crime. Watch out too for stories that illustrate the extent of globalisation, and that show inequalities and power differences.

Department: Spanish
Head of Department: Mrs Jenkins-Baldock
Contact email: hjenkins-baldock@mggs.org

Tasks (in priority order):
All tasks are described below and any additional resources required can be found in this folder.
Those marked with a * must be submitted to your class teacher when you start the A Level/Cambridge Technical course.

  1. * Revise all GCSE grammar as outlined in AQA GCSE Spanish specification
    GCSE Grammar Booklet
    Conjugemos.com
    Once you have joined the Sixth Form at MGGS you will have access to the websites we subscribe to.
  2. * Bridging the gap activities part one, part two, part three and answers
    Spanish – Bridging the Gap part one
    Spanish – Bridging the gap part two
    Spanish – Bridging the Gap part three
  3. * News comprehension activities for A Level topics
    Spanish – El-Bolet-n-by-OllieMFL_01
    Spanish – El-Bolet-n-by-OllieMFL_02
    Spanish – El-Bolet-n-by-OllieMFL_03
    Spanish – El-Bolet-n-by-OllieMFL_04
    Spanish – El-Bolet-n-by-OllieMFL_05
    Spanish – El-Bolet-n-by-OllieMFL_06
    Spanish – El-Bolet-n-by-OllieMFL_07
    Spanish – El-Bolet-n-by-OllieMFL_08
    Spanish – El-Bolet-n-by-OllieMFL_09
    Spanish – El-Bolet-n-by-OllieMFL_10
    Spanish – El-Bolet-n-by-OllieMFLV3_11
  4. * Download a newspaper app such 20minutos.es onto your phone. Read at least two newspaper articles per week and attempt to translate some or all parts of the articles you have read into English. You do not need to understand every word.
  5. Listen to a podcast in Spanish once a week. A good starting point is Duolingo but there are lots of others available.
  6. Watch a Spanish film or TV series on Netflix or Prime – see the list for ideas of films & series to watch on Netflix (I am a big fan of Las Chicas del Cable and La Casa de Papell)
  7. Use lyricstraining to listen to music and practise your Spanish. Once you have a school email address you will gain access to Lirica as well.
  8. Create or search for a Spotify playlist of Spanish music, such as Música Pop en español. If Enrique Iglesias or Daddy Yankee is not your cup of tea, look for alternative Spanish music or whatever type you like as there will be an equivalent in Spanish.
  9. If you want a challenge, try some of the Higher activities from the literature resources. The answers are at the end.
  10. Make sure you are familiar with Spanish / Latin American geography; particularly the different regions in Spain and where they are.

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